Coffee is the liquid of life. I drink it unsweet to make a political point that I cannot now remember but that I can assure you is of world historical significance. Since the day I discovered that my body was a neon board of political signs, I have never looked back. And today, I can safely says that I have revolutionized the way revolutions are performed. Check this out. The other day, I devised a way of drinking my coffee in a way that fought world hunger. The point is that irrespective of the temper of the weather and the world, I can put in my daily quota of freedom fighting. I begin by taking an unremarkable sip of overpriced coffee while sitting in a genuinely rotten chair in a hip-pie café.  Raised to eye level so that all can see the title, I pretend to  read an old collection of Plato’s dialogue I found a year ago at the thrift store down the road. There are two reasons I am not really reading Plato. First, reading brings on a very oppressive mental lethargy that more often than not ends up in melancholy that is brought on by the realization that I love pretending to read much more than reading.  But I am also busy looking at this girl, whose face is buried in a newspaper she is holding up side down. I am hoping she is looking at my coffee shop props: a handsome pile of café classics—Art of war, Tao Te Ching, Beowulf, To The Light House, and good ole Moby.

I hold a doctorate in English from Duke University and recently joined the Marquette University English faculty as an Assistant Professor. I love teaching African fiction and contemporary British novels. Brittle Paper is the virtual space/station where I play and experiment with ideas on how to reinvent African fiction and literary culture.

3 Responses to “Cafe Conversations: Coffee Shop Props” Subscribe

  1. Boye 2010/08/03 at 19:32 #

    I drink coffee unsweetened also and started drinking my beverages unsweetened when the sugar stopped being a commodity and became a luxury item in Nigeria.

  2. Boye 2010/08/03 at 19:33 #

    sugar and not “the sugar”

  3. Ainehi 2010/08/04 at 03:09 #

    Yeah Boye. Sugar is totally overrated.

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I hold a doctorate in English from Duke University and recently joined the Marquette University English faculty as an Assistant Professor. I love teaching African fiction and contemporary British novels. Brittle Paper is the virtual space/station where I play and experiment with ideas on how to reinvent African fiction and literary culture.

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