New Blog at The New Yorker

The New Yorker unveiled The Page-Turner today. As if there aren’t enough blogs about lit things. They say the essays featured are “elaborations” on lit chit chat. What you do when you fight about or gush over a certain piece of writing with friends and colleagues and perhaps the stranger you meet at the bus stop. Imagine expanding those sort of exchanges into an essay. 

The inaugural pieces are:

Salman Rushdie on the spectre of censorship; a dissenting view on the immortality of “Death of a Salesman,” by Giles Harvey; Mary Norris on the subtle marvellousness of the medieval thorn; and Nick Thompson on the risks of the running life. Read more

Anyway, I’m hurrying off to the books section of the UK Guardian, so I’ve only had the chance to read Rushdie’s piece. Is it old age or what? Why does Rushdie keep spouting these foofoo liberal cliches about freedom and creativity. Last time he was at Duke Uni, it was: “Man is a storytelling animal.” Today on Page-Turner it’s: “Liberty is the air we breathe.” And why is Rushdie spending three chunky paragraphs explaining how no one takes notice of the air we breath because it’s free, how creative freedom is, in a sense, like air, and how we need freedom to be creative?

Please Page-Turner, go easy on the token essays by big names. We’re hankering for genuinely lovely essays. Hope you deliver.

 

Photo Credit: Eiler, Lyntha Scott

Tags: , , , , ,

I'm finishing up a phd at Duke University where I study African novels, which I believe are some of the loveliest things ever written. Brittle Paper is the virtual space/station where I play and experiment with ideas on how to reinvent African fiction and literary culture.

No comments yet.

Leave a Reply

I hold a doctorate in English from Duke University and recently joined the Marquette University English faculty as an Assistant Professor. I love teaching African fiction and contemporary British novels. Brittle Paper is the virtual space/station where I play and experiment with ideas on how to reinvent African fiction and literary culture.

Subscribe to Blog via Email

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Archives

Lidudumalingani: “I cannot help but feel his body against mine, light and fragile”

1473917_800x450-e1472061931760

In the past few days, this image of a boy covered in dust and blood has been making its rounds […]

Things Fall Apart should be buried and never made to resurrect

Untitled design (42)

Onyeka Nwelue is the king of African literary controversy. In the age of political correctness, Nwelue dishes out a steady stream […]

Liquid Blue | by Keith Mundangepfupfu | African Poetry

CarpeDiem. (7)

Here, Us dancing Queening like Beyoncé Blaming it all on the Vodka and the MaryJane Dreading the hangover tomorrow Enjoying […]

The Spirit and The Chi | by T.J. Benson | An African Story

The Spirit and The Chi (1)

The Chi of a young woman and the spirit of her late grandmother argued over who should take care of […]

The Long-awaited One | by Priscilla Adipa | An African Story

CarpeDiem. (5)

I lost my arm in a zoo. That’s what she tells them when they stare with bewildered eyes, and turn […]

Review | Imbolo Mbue’s Behold the Dreamers Reinvents the Classic Immigrant Story

Behold the Dreamers is beautifully Achebean.

Imbolo Mbue opens Behold the Dreamers with a quote from Deuteronomy in which Moses speaks of a future arrival in […]