The Intouchables—Racist or Cheesy?

I t’s grossed 300 million dollars world wide since it was released in November, and it opens in the US—New York and L.A.—tomorrow. It’s The Intouchables, a French bromance between a quadriplegic and his carer, Driss, played by the dashing Omar Sy. It’s a typical buddy movie but carries its fair share of racial baggage. As you’d expect, the house is divided.

Mostly film critics: it’s a cheesy movie with a racist subtext.

The Masses: well, the box office speaks for itself.

Salon‘s Andrew O’Hehir tries to look at both sides of the divide in this interesting piece:

It’s probably fair to summarize this movie as being the story of a paralyzed white man who needs the help of a younger, stronger, more virile black man to reconnect with his own masculinity, and if you want to say that narrative reflects an underlying latticework of racist attitudes, I won’t argue with you. Continue Reading:

But then watch the trailer and tell me you’re not going to see it when it comes to a theatre near you. It look pretty damn adorable.

TRAILER: The Intouchables

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I'm finishing up a phd at Duke University where I study African novels, which I believe are some of the loveliest things ever written. Brittle Paper is the virtual space/station where I play and experiment with ideas on how to reinvent African fiction and literary culture.

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I hold a doctorate in English from Duke University and recently joined the Marquette University English faculty as an Assistant Professor. I love teaching African fiction and contemporary British novels. Brittle Paper is the virtual space/station where I play and experiment with ideas on how to reinvent African fiction and literary culture.

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