Alice Walker’s Strange Boycott

Alice Walker, an American novelist, doesn’t want her novel, The Color Purple, re-issued in Israel. A boycott of some kind to fight against Israel’s mistreatment of Palestinians. I get the fight part. I just don’t see how it’s helpful to prevent people from reading a book that might challenge their perception on social injustice. The Color Purple centers on inequality and oppression. What’s the point in witholding such a book from the very people you accuse of being guilty of those very things? It also just seems a bit weird that an author would put a ban on her own work. She might as well plan a book-burning party of all existing copies of The Color Purple in Israel. What do you think?


Guardian UK on the issue

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I'm finishing up a phd at Duke University where I study African novels, which I believe are some of the loveliest things ever written. Brittle Paper is the virtual space/station where I play and experiment with ideas on how to reinvent African fiction and literary culture.

One Response to “Alice Walker’s Strange Boycott” Subscribe

  1. Alahyo 2012/06/21 at 3:17 pm #

    I emphatically disagree with your “logic”. Godspeed.

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