Laolu Senbanjo is a Lagos-based artist. I encountered his work for the first time on Bella Naija and then on Ndani TV. He is known for mind-bending images that are infused with a touch of the urban and the mythical. Take a close look at his images. What do they bring to your mind? How do you understand what Laolu is trying to do here? If we understand Afromysterics as some kind of African science of mystery, what do these images tell us about Africa, its sense of time, space, and the body? Fascinating stuff. Laolu has a cool website HERE

My style of art is called “afro-mysterics” it simply means the mystery of the African thought pattern. These masterpieces are full of meaning and deep thinking. My art is spiritual. Nothing in life happens by accident. Art is what you call it. Life is what you make it. Every symbol has a meaning. Every face has an expression. The different patterns tell their own stories. — Laolu Senbanjo

WATCH LAOLU DO HIS MAGIC — NDANI TV

Welcome to my world! You might be wondering why I prefer the to use charcoal, the reason is that charcoal is one of the oldest art materials. It was what our pre-historic ancestors used while drawing on cave walls. Charcoal is an impure form of elemental carbon made by burning selected woods in anaerbic conditions. While other art materials may have greater color saturation than charcoal, only a few will last as long. The joy of using charcoal as a drawing medium lies in its spontaneity and sensitivity. It opens a giant door of creativity and imagination. — Laolu Senbanjo

 

Laolu S.

Laolu S.

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I hold a doctorate in English from Duke University and recently joined the Marquette University English faculty as an Assistant Professor. I love teaching African fiction and contemporary British novels. Brittle Paper is the virtual space/station where I play and experiment with ideas on how to reinvent African fiction and literary culture.

2 Responses to “Afromysterics And The Narratives Of A Busy Mind” Subscribe

  1. Chi Town Represent 2012/10/18 at 19:20 #

    Wow, very impressive artist. He conjures quite a bit of emotion and thought in his detail. It’s organic but modern. Thanks for sharing, Brittler.

  2. Ainehi Edoro 2012/10/18 at 19:43 #

    Thanks!

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I hold a doctorate in English from Duke University and recently joined the Marquette University English faculty as an Assistant Professor. I love teaching African fiction and contemporary British novels. Brittle Paper is the virtual space/station where I play and experiment with ideas on how to reinvent African fiction and literary culture.

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