Nigerian author, Tolulope Popoola, shares with us a flash fiction piece written specially for Brittle Paper readers. Enjoy. 

I sensed something was wrong. All week, I’d had a bad feeling following me around like an ominous shadow. I started to lose my appetite. I became restless. I couldn’t put my finger on it, because everything still looked the same. My husband was still out of a job, like he’d been for the past ten months. I was still the breadwinner. The only thing that had changed there was the fact that I was putting in extra hours at work to make some more money. My best friend and neighbour, Jumoke had been a big help in the past few months, helping me with cooking and freezing some food, so that Lanre could have something to eat on those evenings I was working late.

Then I remembered. It was our tenth wedding anniversary next Friday. I groaned as I got off the bed. It was Saturday today; I didn’t have to go to work so I’d switched off my alarm last night. I went to the bathroom to wash my face and clean my teeth. Lanre was already up, probably downstairs in the garden, I thought. Apart from job-hunting, gardening was the only activity keeping him busy. I shook my head at the thought of him, just a year ago, a powerful corporate lawyer, now pottering in the garden, weeding and planting. I could sense him withdrawing slowly, deeper into his shell. He talked to me less and less. He often looked ashamed, maybe even guilty.

I didn’t feel much like celebrating our anniversary but I decided to make an effort. Maybe that would cheer us both up. At least, we were still together, and we were not totally unhappy, I told myself. Even though my mother had predicted that we would not last. Well, dear mother, I’ve proved you wrong these past ten years.

I came downstairs to the kitchen to make a cup of coffee. I started making plans in my head. We could have dinner at the swankiest restaurant in town, the one with a balcony that overlooked the city. Or go and see a musical in the West End… I would need Jumoke to help me plan it so that it would be a surprise. I decided to pay her a quick visit to ask for her help. I grabbed my coat and slipped out of the door without telling Lanre I was popping out briefly.

Jumoke hadn’t locked the door to her back garden. I went into her kitchen, but it was strangely quiet. Where was she? I opened the door to the living room. I couldn’t believe my eyes. I stifled a scream and suddenly felt nauseous.

Jumoke spoke first.

“Shade, I’m very sorry. You weren’t supposed to find out this way.”

My husband and my best friend! That was the last thought in my head before I  turned around and fled the house.

————————————————————————————————————————–

Tolulope Popoola is a Nigerian novelist. Her debut novel, titled Nothing Comes Close, is available on amazon. Ms. Popoola blogs at On Writing and Life.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Post image by Nigerian artist, Boloebi Okah.

Feature image: Flash Fiction World

 

Tags: , , ,

(adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({});

3 Responses to “FLASH FICTION | Betrayal by Tolulope Popoola” Subscribe

  1. Brie-Ashley 2013/07/05 at 10:25 #

    Wow, such an amazing story,quite interesting….

  2. Priceless Sofiya 2013/07/05 at 19:33 #

    Bravo! I was held spell-bound from the beginning to the end.

Trackbacks/Pingbacks

  1. The Proposal That Wasn’t Quite A Proposal. | In Leotard - 2013/12/29

    […] Another special thing about this piece is the fact that it bears a certain semblance to Tolu Popoola’s Betrayal. […]

Leave a Reply

I hold a doctorate in English from Duke University and recently joined the Marquette University English faculty as an Assistant Professor. I love teaching African fiction and contemporary British novels. Brittle Paper is the virtual space/station where I play and experiment with ideas on how to reinvent African fiction and literary culture.

Subscribe to Blog via Email

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Archives

The Night My Dead Girlfriend Called | Episode 4: Confronting the ‘Devil’ | by Feyisayo Anjorin

tnmdgc-header

The only thing of iron, plastic, or leather-padding matter in the well-lit shrine of Pa Fakunle was the treadmill for […]

Apes and Satellites | by Mame Bougouma Diene | African Sci-fi

untitled-design29

The ChinaCorp mining-satellite shifted across the planetary terminator, separating from its twin in stationary orbit over the Eastern Chinese Republic’s […]

Is the Ake Festival a Bubble? | Okechukwu Ofili Calls for a Reality Check

untitled-design28

The Ake Arts and Book Festival is an amazing event. It assembles some of the best minds in literature and […]

Zadie Smith and Namwali Serpell on Femininity and Writing

zadie-3

Zadie Smith has an uncommon ability to tell stories that capture our hearts. But she’s also shown herself to be […]

My Feminism | Remembering to Scream | By Wana Udobang

untitled-design27

I don’t remember the first time my father hit my mother. But I often remember my brother’s hands muzzling my […]

Greg Ruth Does Something Amazing with Okorafor’s Female Characters

untitled-design-60

Nnedi Okorafor’s novels are universally loved. She builds her fictional worlds and fashions her characters from the most unusual elements. […]