Okigbo

(A little background on the poem: it is written in the form of a canzone, a type of Italian or Provencal poetry that is usually set to music.  “Debtor’s Lane” is part of the series of four canzones that Okigbo wrote between 1957-1961. An Ogene is a traditional Igbo instrument.)

—————————————————–

A & B: THIS is debtors’ lane, this is
the new haven, where wrinkled faces
watch the wall clock strike each hour
in a dry cellar.

A: NO heavenly transports now
of youthful passion
and the endless succession
of tempers and moods
in high societies;
no blasts no buffets
of a mad generation
nor the sonorous arguments
of the hollow brass
and the copious cups
of fraudulent misses
in brothels
of a mad generation.

A & B: HERE rather let us lie in a new haven,
drinking in the air that we breathe in
until it chokes us and we die.
Here rather let us lie with wrinkled faces
watching the wall clock strike each hour
in a dry cellar.

B: THERE was the tenement
in hangman’s lane
where repose was a dream
unreal
and a knock on the door
at dawn
hushed the tenant humped
beneath the bed:
was it the postman
or the bailiff with a writ?
And if the telephone rang
alas, if the telephone rang …
Was he to hang up his life
on a rack
and answer the final call?

A & B: HERE rather let us nest in a new haven
awaiting the tap tap tap on the door
that brings in light at dawn.
Here rather let us rest with wrinkled faces
watching the wall clock strike each hour
in a dry cellar.

 

Originally published in Black Orpheus, Number 11, 1962.

Image via

Tags: , , , ,

I hold a doctorate in English from Duke University and recently joined the Marquette University English faculty as an Assistant Professor. I love teaching African fiction and contemporary British novels. Brittle Paper is the virtual space/station where I play and experiment with ideas on how to reinvent African fiction and literary culture.

No comments yet.

Leave a Reply

I hold a doctorate in English from Duke University and recently joined the Marquette University English faculty as an Assistant Professor. I love teaching African fiction and contemporary British novels. Brittle Paper is the virtual space/station where I play and experiment with ideas on how to reinvent African fiction and literary culture.

Subscribe to Blog via Email

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Archives

Adichie Revisits the Single Story in New Animated Interview with The Atlantic

adichie atlantic interview

Chimamanda Adichie stole our hearts with “The Danger of a Single Story.” Purple Hibiscus and Half of a Yellow Sun had been […]

Monsieur Pierre | By Bura-Bari Nwilo | A Story

nwilo monsieur

“Whenever she gets the urge to forego Roy, she also gets a small dose of mischief, to lie with him […]

The Final Portrait of A Dead Artist | By Romeo Oriogun | Poetry

oriogun portrait

“…the smell of turpentine fills the air as he paints the sea into a man.”   I hear it from […]

Memoirs of a Lagos Wedding Planner | Episode 6: When In-Laws Misbehave | by Tolulope Popoola

This wedding was turning out to be more work than I had envisaged. After the first two meetings with the […]

You Should Be a Gift | By Ife Olujuyigbe | A Story

Olujuyigbe gift

“I know you know I need you to save face, and you need me to pander to your whims.” *** […]

The Gift-Bearers | By Leke David Omowaiye | A Story

gift Omowaiye

“Don’t you think you should pick that tomato and apologise?” “For weytin now? E reach five Naira? Abeg! Abeg! Abeg!” […]