Bibi Bakare-Yusuf by Jeremy Weate

When Bibi Bakare-Yusuf and her husband, Jeremy Weate, set up Cassava Republic, the Nigerian publishing industry was in pretty bad shape. They had little or no financial backing and had to put up with the difficulties of finding places to do high-quality printing. They were essentially trying to sell books in place where there was no working distribution network.

That was in 2006. After publishing everyone from Teju Cole to Mukoma wa Ngugi, Cassava Republic has earned its place as one of the top presses in Africa.

Watch the video of the ever vivacious and ridiculously smart and articulate Bibi Bakare-Yusuf talk about why Africa so badly needs to take charge of its “intellectual production” machinery.

 

Image via Jeremy Weate

Cassava Republic Press from jolyon hoff on Vimeo.

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I hold a doctorate in English from Duke University and recently joined the Marquette University English faculty as an Assistant Professor. I love teaching African fiction and contemporary British novels. Brittle Paper is the virtual space/station where I play and experiment with ideas on how to reinvent African fiction and literary culture.

2 Responses to “VIDEO—Politics of the Belly vs Poetics of the Belly. Bibi Bakare on Book Culture in Africa” Subscribe

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  1. Famzing African Literary Stars: Meeting Jeremy Weate The Cassava Man | Brittle Paper - 2013/10/10

    […] a bit about Jeremy if you don’t already know him. Jeremy and his wife Bibi Bakare-Yusuf co-founded Cassava Republic. You could say they brought the indie press phenomenon to Nigeria or […]

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I hold a doctorate in English from Duke University and recently joined the Marquette University English faculty as an Assistant Professor. I love teaching African fiction and contemporary British novels. Brittle Paper is the virtual space/station where I play and experiment with ideas on how to reinvent African fiction and literary culture.

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