Transmissions

If history were a theatre, the global war on terror would be one of the most catastrophic dramas of our time. Here is Teju Cole’s attempt to imagine what the soundtrack would look like.

This is how he describes the project in a Facebook status:

When The State Magazine (based in the United Arab Emirates) asked me to DJ a mix, I asked myself what a soundtrack for the Global War on Terror might look like. Here’s the result.

Okay. My question is this: do I dance to this? It’s a musical reflection on violence and the global war machine. Should I just listen and think deep thoughts about life made captive to the mechanism  of war or should I dance? Would it be a dance of joy or sadness or pain or anger? A violent dance? Or just some pure, formless dance?

Anyway, love that African writers are sending their message and sharing their thoughts through different forms of media. Last week, I posted NoViolet Bulawayo’s Spotify playlist, a compilation of songs inspired by her debut novel, We Need New Names.

 

 

1. The Gloaming (DJ Shadow Remix) | Radiohead | DJ Shadow Remix

2. Zombie | Cerebral Vortex, Frown & Spoek Mathambo | Red Hot + Fela World

3. Capacity (Lynn, Bronx) | Vijay Iyer & Mike Ladd | Holding It Down: The Veterans’ Dreams Project (feat. Maurice Decaul & Lynn Hill)

4. Galang (Trio Riot Version) | The Vijay Iyer Trio | Historicity

5. Soup Boys [Prod. By Lushlife] | Heems | Wild Water Kingdom

6. Auditorium Feat. The Ruler | Yasiin Bey (Mos Def) | The REcstatic (Remix Album

7. Mshini Wam (feat. Avuyile Tosa & Yolanda Fyrus Xashi) | Spoek Mathambo | Mshini Wam

8. Plastic | Portishead | Third

9. GDMFSOB | DJ Shadow | The Private Repres

10. Revelator | Gillian Welch | Time (The Relevator)

11. 100,000 People | Philip Glass | The Fog of War

12. [untitled] | Burial | Untrue

I hold a doctorate in English from Duke University and recently joined the Marquette University English faculty as an Assistant Professor. I love teaching African fiction and contemporary British novels. Brittle Paper is the virtual space/station where I play and experiment with ideas on how to reinvent African fiction and literary culture.

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I hold a doctorate in English from Duke University and recently joined the Marquette University English faculty as an Assistant Professor. I love teaching African fiction and contemporary British novels. Brittle Paper is the virtual space/station where I play and experiment with ideas on how to reinvent African fiction and literary culture.

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