Shakira

Gabriel “Gabo” Garcia Marques died a few days ago. What a loss! His 1967 classic, 100 Years of Solitude, is the definitive magic realist text. I remember reading the novel for the first time in the summer of 2011. It was such a sad and dreary summer. I lived through it only because I could escape into Marquez’s surreal universe.

Shakira joined the chorus of celebrities mourning the passing of her fellow countryman. The Columbian songstress left this lovely memorial on her website, which she signed with the alias, “Shak.” She also posted a photo of herself and Marquez. The photo was taken in Mexico in 2011.

Dear Gabo, you once said that life isn’t what one lived, but the life one remembers and how he remembers it to retell it…your life, dear Gabo, will be remembered by all of us as a unique and singular gift, and as the most original story of all. It’s difficult to say goodbye to you, with all that you’ve given us! You will always be in my heart and in those of all who loved and admired you. Shak

shakira-says-goodbye-colombian-author

I read in the Toronto Star that there just might be a posthumous work of fiction titled We’ll Meet in August. 

I thought I’d add a Marquez quote on writing:

Ultimately, literature is nothing but carpentry. Writing something is almost as hard as making a table. With both you are working with reality, a material just as hard as wood. Both are full of tricks and techniques. Basically very little magic and a lot of hard work are involved. I never have done any carpentry but it’s the job I admire most, especially because you can never find anyone to do it for you.

— Paris Review, Art of Fiction, No 69 [read full interview HERE]

 

Images via Shakira’s website.

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I hold a doctorate in English from Duke University and recently joined the Marquette University English faculty as an Assistant Professor. I love teaching African fiction and contemporary British novels. Brittle Paper is the virtual space/station where I play and experiment with ideas on how to reinvent African fiction and literary culture.

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I hold a doctorate in English from Duke University and recently joined the Marquette University English faculty as an Assistant Professor. I love teaching African fiction and contemporary British novels. Brittle Paper is the virtual space/station where I play and experiment with ideas on how to reinvent African fiction and literary culture.

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