A man calling himself Chinedu Ezigbo of Abatete  posted this piece on Village Square about a week ago. He calls out Chimamanda for writing her novels solely in English and for her political views on feminism and homosexuality, saying that Achebe would not approve of the Nigerian novelist’s pro-gay stance. 

“I have followed Chimamanda everywhere, facebook, youtube, TEDTalk, you name it,” he writes, “I have gone beyond her books to read her body language, her gesticulations, her appearance, all of which sums into her brand.”

He claims that this careful study of her work [and her gestures] has helped him figure out why “her brand” bothers him and gives him what he calls “a feeling of creepiness.”

Check out quotes from the essay after the image and let us know what you think of his criticisms.  

 

chimamanda-adichie-royal-africa-society

On Not Writing in Igbo:

Nonetheless, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie is an Igbo-African writer who is yet to write for her own people. All through her works, she has put the story of her own people into beautiful paperbacks for the reading West. And she has been successful. While Nigerians and Ndigbo celebrate her success, they have not been able to enjoy their identity in these stories.

On Not Taking Her Husband’s Name {see adichie’s comments HERE}

I have been pressured not to add a prefix to her name since it will be unAfrican of me to address a woman whose Igbo family took a dowry on as Miss instead of Mrs.; Chimamanda’s insistence to be addressed as Miss Adichie instead of Mrs. Adichie (to excuse her ‘name in fame’ in the hope that her documented last name is her husbands’), is a clear case of the contrast between what she portrays – appearance, writing  and who she is – Igbo-African woman.

On Adichie’s Feminism {watch video HERE}

I root for her understanding and explication of feminism, but if [refusing to take her husband’s name] is any part of what she means by feminism then she is a bigger contradiction than I ever thought. My simple proof is that since I am neither her father nor husband, I may not address her as Mrs, but in the same vein I will not address her as Miss, since that will be against our common traditional heritage and values which in itself has no guile nor will its obliteration be a proof of feminism in any case.

On Criticism of Anti-gay Bill {read adichie’s essay HERE}

Why wouldn’t she, when Europe and America will be eager to read or hear her take on a more global issue like homosexuality, a way of life in the very fiber of the west and a decisive factor for who becomes president of the United States…So, maybe because she has to keep the handshake with her western publishers, Literary Awards and various festival Organizers, talk show hosts and interviewers Chimamanda did not stop to think that Sochukwuma [the subject of Adichie’s essay] was from another clime and culture that is not western enough yet to deal differently with the epiphany of same sex unions for their kits and kin. I am more than certain that she knew all these except that she must keep selling her story to the west – her greatest buyers.

Why Achebe Would not Approve:  

Incidentally, Chimamanda and I share the same icon Albert Chinualumogu Achebe and we all come from the same area, only about 20 minutes from each others’ town. Achebe is one of those who are victors in the battle between westernization and Igbo-Africanness. He did not lose his head in that battle just like Chimamanda is already doing. The literary icon whom Chimamanda and I adore is an ozo title holder whom I am certain will not take Chimamanda’s stand on homosexuality in Nigeria even if that stand would sell a trillion of his published works and give him a worlds record breaking offer for more publishing.

 

Read full article HERE.

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I hold a doctorate in English from Duke University and recently joined the Marquette University English faculty as an Assistant Professor. I love teaching African fiction and contemporary British novels. Brittle Paper is the virtual space/station where I play and experiment with ideas on how to reinvent African fiction and literary culture.

4 Responses to “Angry Fan Calls Out Adichie Over Pro-Gay Stance, Says Achebe Would’nt Approve” Subscribe

  1. Sideeye 2014/05/29 at 09:55 #

    Dude is so full of it! I am half Igbo and I cannot speak/read Igbo, neither can some of my cousins who are full Igbo. By writing in Igbo, Adichie opened up her book to all Nigerians. Per taking her husband’s last name, if we really want to get down to it…last names are not truly Igbo, they’re a Western thing. I didn’t know necromancers existed because that’s the only way the guy can verify Achebe’s thoughts on homosexuality.

  2. Oyin Oludipe 2014/05/31 at 06:02 #

    Whooping sentiments. We meet them at crossroads of ambitions

  3. mariam sule 2015/03/06 at 15:56 #

    Smh. Uncle needs to take several seats. Get with it.

  4. Ugodiya 2015/05/16 at 22:48 #

    Sideeye, I am full Igbo and will explain to you. In Igbo culture last name matters and are especially in the core of a woman’s life. For e.g. a woman goes from “obu nwa onye?” to “onye na anu ya?”

    This also applies to the men folk. People are today in the hinterlands identified by their family names. That is how it has been and this is how it still is.

    I read the article and did not see where the author suggested that Ms. Adichie should write in Igbo language. I think its a misrepresentation of the author whom I read and understood to be saying that she has not written for “Nigerians and Igbos”… so will that mean he is asking that she writes not just in Igbo language but in Nigerian language as well. And so I ask, is there a Nigerian language?

    I think the author is simply saying that Adichie writes for the west and has not made her impact felt well enough in her country, among her people.

    I have seen various commentaries on this and was directed to read Adichie’s article The President I want. I did and realized that this article by Chinedu Ezigbo is a response to that. May be you should do the same, for better understanding.

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I hold a doctorate in English from Duke University and recently joined the Marquette University English faculty as an Assistant Professor. I love teaching African fiction and contemporary British novels. Brittle Paper is the virtual space/station where I play and experiment with ideas on how to reinvent African fiction and literary culture.

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