Our Flash Fiction Queen, Ms. Tolulope Popoola, graces our presence with this brand new selection. It’s been a while since we posted her work, and have we missed her! We are loving this particular story because it has Popoola pushing the limits of the flash fiction genre. At 380 words, the story is extremely short, but trust Popoola to squeeze in enough drama, suspense, and delightful twists and turns. A gorgeous little story. Enjoy! — Editor’s Note

jamilla-okubo-1

Biola was tired of her husband’s attitude, and she was tired of pretending everything was fine in their marriage. She decided to suggest marriage counseling to him.

“Marriage counseling? What is wrong with us?” Deji asked, seeming truly shocked.

“I’m not happy, and I want us to sort out our issues.” Biola said.

“What issues?” Deji countered. “I don’t have time for this. If you want counseling, go on your own.”

Biola sulked and pouted for days, until she eventually decided that she would go on her own.

Her first appointment with Dr Folake went well. She asked all the important questions about Deji and why Biola was not satisfied with him.

“Does he beat you?”

“No”

“Is he unfaithful to you?”

“No.”

“Does he come home late?”

“Yes! You’ve got that right. My husband comes home late all the time. He works too hard, and he doesn’t listen to me….”

By the time Biola finished explaining, and her allocated hour was up, Dr Folake agreed that she would need to speak to Deji herself.

“Tell him to come and see me next week.”

“Yes, I’ll make sure he comes whether he wants to or not.” Biola said. She thanked Dr Folake and skipped home happily.

For the rest of the week, she nagged Deji every chance she got, until he gave in.

“Fine!” he said, finally. “I’ll go to one appointment with your therapist. But you can be sure that I won’t do it again.”

But to Biola’s surprise and delight, not only did Deji go for the counseling session the next day, he started going regularly every week. Within a few months, she began to notice changes in him. He smiled more. He was less stressed out and more relaxed, he took up exercise and he even started coming home earlier and cooking dinner for her.

One Saturday morning, he went out for his morning run, and stopped by the florist on his way back home. Biola was excited when she saw him arriving with the huge bouquet of flowers.

“What’s that for?” she asked.

Deji looked at her and smiled.

“The flowers are for Dr Folake. She and I are going to Paris together this evening. I’m leaving you.”

 

The post image is by Jamilla Okubo. I love her work. Check out her artistic universe HERE. 

***

Tolulope Popoola Tolulope Popoola is a Nigerian novelist. Her debut novel, titled Nothing Comes Close, is available on amazon. Popoola blogs at On Writing and Life.

 

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I hold a doctorate in English from Duke University and recently joined the Marquette University English faculty as an Assistant Professor. I love teaching African fiction and contemporary British novels. Brittle Paper is the virtual space/station where I play and experiment with ideas on how to reinvent African fiction and literary culture.

7 Responses to ““The Flowers are For” — Counselling Swap by Tolulope Popoola | A Flash Fiction” Subscribe

  1. Nalongo 2014/05/30 at 03:03 #

    I saw it coming, but the doctor violated proffessional ethics.

  2. Toin 2014/05/30 at 05:58 #

    Sigh

  3. Lara 2014/05/30 at 06:56 #

    Hahahaha!

  4. Oyin Oludipe 2014/05/31 at 06:44 #

    Aww.

    Deji was a wet soap, that Biola sought to grip too hard.

    Thanks for sharing this…

  5. Obinna Udenwe 2014/06/01 at 16:31 #

    No comment. Na laugh I dey laugh. Nice story.

  6. Ayodeji. R. 2014/06/03 at 16:06 #

    Betrayal. Forever sweet!

  7. funmi adeniran 2014/06/05 at 05:29 #

    Lovely, guessed as much. Great ending.

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I hold a doctorate in English from Duke University and recently joined the Marquette University English faculty as an Assistant Professor. I love teaching African fiction and contemporary British novels. Brittle Paper is the virtual space/station where I play and experiment with ideas on how to reinvent African fiction and literary culture.

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