As far as contemporary African writing goes, the US release of Everyday for the Thief, a novella by Teju Cole, was a nice way to bring the first quarter of 2014 to a close.

When the book was first published in Nigeria a few years ago by Nigeria’s premier indie publisher, Cassava Republic, it was well received though not nearly as enthusiastically as it has been here in the US. The book has been enjoying lots of international love since its March 25 release. Critics and bloggers have had nothing but praise for Cole’s searing account of  Lagos.

Everyday for the Thief is a quirky little book. It’s a mix of text and images that chronicles the experience of “a young Nigerian living in New York City  [who] goes home to Lagos for a short visit, finding a city both familiar and strange.”

{Download the book HERE}

Those of you who have read the first edition should know that Cole added new photographs, some of which he took during his more recent visits to Lagos.

Here are a few of the pretty amazing shots of Lagos:

There are more photographs here.

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I hold a doctorate in English from Duke University and recently joined the Marquette University English faculty as an Assistant Professor. I love teaching African fiction and contemporary British novels. Brittle Paper is the virtual space/station where I play and experiment with ideas on how to reinvent African fiction and literary culture.

3 Responses to “Stunning Photographs in Teju Cole’s Lagos Novella” Subscribe

  1. Oyin Oludipe 2014/06/04 at 09:57 #

    So denotative and beautiful shots. Thumbs up to Cole. I loved that book. Fast-paced

  2. Catherine Onyemelukwe 2014/06/04 at 13:21 #

    I liked Open City by Teju Cole very much. I listened to it on my iPod, and just got Every Day is for the Thief likewise for my iPod. But I see there are photos – I may have to buy the Kindle version as well!

    Thanks for sharing the info about the novella.

  3. Ainehi Edoro 2014/06/04 at 13:26 #

    Yes, Catherine. I definitely recommend you do. The story isn’t complete without the images.

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I hold a doctorate in English from Duke University and recently joined the Marquette University English faculty as an Assistant Professor. I love teaching African fiction and contemporary British novels. Brittle Paper is the virtual space/station where I play and experiment with ideas on how to reinvent African fiction and literary culture.

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