ada-umeofia-ada-lagos

She tried to follow the flock and go with the wind
But in her blue-speckled, red-splattered, green-hued coat, she clashed.
Stark and different, she stood out.
She bumped against many, flew alongside sameness, and landed straight into the wearied fatigue of ordinariness.

It was stiff
Bland
Dull
Safe

Then she jumped on the wind
Flew against it
Back against the sun
Shadows dropping fast
Higher and higher
Testing the contrary winds
Strengthening her once fragile wings

This was her waiting to happen
She became a miracle in motion.
Colorful
Beautiful
Wise
Sure

The rush
The power
The thrill
The knowledge
The strength

 

Image by Ada Umeofia. Love her work! Check out more of her stuff at ThatVoid

About the Author

Onomarie @ Shoot 2 copyOnomarie Francesca Uriri is a graduate of English Literature from the University of Lagos; a marketing communications executive by day and a writer for the rest of the time in between. I believe in the power of words, the efficacy of prayer and the goodness of people. I have varied interests, but primary amongst them are writing, reading, travelling, meeting people and experiencing different cultures.

I’m fascinated with my personal universe. believe that we are all part of a constant, wondrous, sometimes crazy flow of life, orchestrated by God because He wants to express Himself in full glory through us.

I love food, fashion, music, white forest cake, family, friends and words… yes, words are definitely my thing!

I hold a doctorate in English from Duke University and recently joined the Marquette University English faculty as an Assistant Professor. I love teaching African fiction and contemporary British novels. Brittle Paper is the virtual space/station where I play and experiment with ideas on how to reinvent African fiction and literary culture.

One Response to ““Fatigue of Ordinariness” | Identity by Onomarie Uriri | A Poem” Subscribe

  1. Oyin Oludipe 2014/08/25 at 20:55 #

    The awakening

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I hold a doctorate in English from Duke University and recently joined the Marquette University English faculty as an Assistant Professor. I love teaching African fiction and contemporary British novels. Brittle Paper is the virtual space/station where I play and experiment with ideas on how to reinvent African fiction and literary culture.

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