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Loving this little love affair between fashion and the African literary scene.

So Teju Cole—the author of Open City—and Ikire Jones, a philly-based fashion designer, are chums. For his “Savage and Saints” 2014 Collection, Ikire Jones names an Ankara-print sport coat after Teju Cole.

Teju who thinks highly of his friend’s work seems quite honored by the gesture. On Facebook, he describes Ikire Jones as “MF Doom meets Yinka Shonibare meets Veronese.”

The made-to-order sport coat called “The Teju” is “a safari jacket…belted, unlined, and uncavassed.” It comes with a whooping 450 dollar price tag.

Just in case you were thinking of getting one, it’s sold out. Sorry.

To be honest, I’m quite tickled by all this. “The Teju” is sold out?

For one thing, Teju Cole’s celebrity status has been officially confirmed. Who said the idea of the novelist as a cool cat is out of fashion?

If Teju’s name could get a line of made-to-order jackets to sell out, he’s worth his salt as far as I’m concerned.

See below for more photos of “The Teju.”

Too see more of what Ikire Jones has to offer, check out his website HERE.

Oh, before I forget, Teju Cole will be hanging out with Salman Rushdie next month at the Symphony Space in New York. Rushdie once said that “Teju Cole is among the most gifted writers of his generation.”

Since we don’t have to guess how Teju feels about Rushdie, there’ll definitely be lots of literary bromancing happening on stage. Def something to check out. 

See more info HERE.

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I hold a doctorate in English from Duke University and recently joined the Marquette University English faculty as an Assistant Professor. I love teaching African fiction and contemporary British novels. Brittle Paper is the virtual space/station where I play and experiment with ideas on how to reinvent African fiction and literary culture.

2 Responses to “Paging All Teju Cole Fans! Check Out The Téju, a Jacket Named After Teju Cole” Subscribe

  1. Fred Khumalo 2014/11/06 at 07:23 #

    This is so cooool!

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  1. Ikire Jones and the art of Blending Fashion and African Storytelling | Brittle Paper - 2015/08/19

    […] they gave a shout out to African literature by naming a sports coat in honor of Teju Cole. [Read here if you missed […]

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I hold a doctorate in English from Duke University and recently joined the Marquette University English faculty as an Assistant Professor. I love teaching African fiction and contemporary British novels. Brittle Paper is the virtual space/station where I play and experiment with ideas on how to reinvent African fiction and literary culture.

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