M ukoma wa Ngugi, Ben Okri and host of well-known writers collaborate in an anthology of stories inspired by food and the relationships we forge around it.

The title of the anthology is Cooked Up: Food Fiction from Around the World.

What a gorgeous idea for a literary project! The collection, curated by London-based writer, Elaine Chiew, and published by New Internationalist, comes out April 14, 2015.

Synopsis:

Food can bring together families, communities, and cultures. It is the essence of life and yet our relationships with one another can be most fraught at the dinner table. This perpetually fascinating subject has inspired a unique collection of fiction—including flash fiction, essay, short stories, and even a “stoku” (amalgam of short story and haiku)—from a wonderfully diverse and international group of authors.

The authors in the anthology include Elaine Chiew, Chitra Banarjee Divakaruni, Rachel J. Fenton, Diana Ferraro, Vanessa Gebbie, Pippa Goldschmidt, Sue Guiney, Patrick J. Holland, Roy Kesey, Charles Lambert, Krys Lee, Stefani Nellen, Mukoma Wa Ngugi, Ben Okri, Angie Pelekidis, Susannah Rickards, and Nikesh Shukla.

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I hold a doctorate in English from Duke University and recently joined the Marquette University English faculty as an Assistant Professor. I love teaching African fiction and contemporary British novels. Brittle Paper is the virtual space/station where I play and experiment with ideas on how to reinvent African fiction and literary culture.

2 Responses to “For the Love of Food! | Ben Okri & Mukoma wa Ngugi Featured in Food Fiction Project” Subscribe

  1. Mary 2015/01/30 at 12:07 #

    I always love it when author’s names are related to their work… Of course the stories curated by Ms. Chiew are about food. Could the relationship be anymore serendipitous?

  2. Ainehi Edoro 2015/01/30 at 12:53 #

    @Mary. LOl. I thought the same thing.

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I hold a doctorate in English from Duke University and recently joined the Marquette University English faculty as an Assistant Professor. I love teaching African fiction and contemporary British novels. Brittle Paper is the virtual space/station where I play and experiment with ideas on how to reinvent African fiction and literary culture.

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