IMG_20150203_212327Guess what was on my doorstep when I got back home from the gym sometime last night. This House Is Not for Sale: A Novel by E. C. Osondu!

It was released yesterday and now it’s on my nightstand 🙂

Am I excited to dig in? Yes.

It’s been a tough but fruitful week with dissertation writing—the other love of my life—which also means that come Friday evening, I’ll be officially dead to any kind of hard-core intellectual thought.

No worries, though, ’cause it’ll be time to soak up my exhausted mind in some African fiction goodness. I hear Osondu’s first novel is a lovely story featuring an ensemble of strange, larger-than-life characters all clustered around this one house in an African neighborhood.

I know Osondu from 2009 when he won the Caine Prize for African Writing, but some how I never got to read his short story collection, Voice of America. Happy I’m getting to catch up with him this time around.

Can’t say I’m blown away by the cover. But I am intrigued by the length of the book: 182 pages with big type—meaning short and petite. I’ve always interpreted the petiteness of a book as a mark of literary confidence, like the book is saying, “I don’t have to say too much to blow your mind away.”

Ha ha ha. Just found out Osondu’s full name. Now know what the E. C. in E. C. Osondu stands for. Oh dear! We’ll just stick to the initials 🙂

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I hold a doctorate in English from Duke University and recently joined the Marquette University English faculty as an Assistant Professor. I love teaching African fiction and contemporary British novels. Brittle Paper is the virtual space/station where I play and experiment with ideas on how to reinvent African fiction and literary culture.

5 Responses to “My African Book Diary | See What Came In The Mail!” Subscribe

  1. Catherine Onyemelukwe 2015/02/04 at 08:23 #

    No fair! You have to tell us what the ‘E’ stands for! I did a quick Google search but didn’t find it. I’ve got too many tasks to accomplish this morning so am resisting further digging.
    And good luck on your thesis writing.

  2. Ainehi Edoro 2015/02/04 at 10:45 #

    @Catherine:

    Lol. I’ve definitely piqued someone’s interest.

  3. Adefemi 2015/02/05 at 08:07 #

    Love the powerful vibes emitted in this one – see what came in the mail. We do expect to be blown away by that thesis of yours; and your ability to deliver is not in doubt and never will. Oh my! Doing what you love is such a delight. AE, just continue to delight yourself. Best wishes Love.

  4. Ainehi Edoro 2015/02/06 at 11:19 #

    @Adefemi:

    Thanks!

  5. mariam sule 2015/03/06 at 07:08 #

    I soooo want to read this.

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I hold a doctorate in English from Duke University and recently joined the Marquette University English faculty as an Assistant Professor. I love teaching African fiction and contemporary British novels. Brittle Paper is the virtual space/station where I play and experiment with ideas on how to reinvent African fiction and literary culture.

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