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Obinna Udenwe’s experience is proof that a writer’s life is never divorced from the realities on ground.

Those who follow Nigerian news know that Nigerians have been battling an acute problem of fuel scarcity.

With petrol hard to come by, prices have skyrocketed. Going to work or conducting business in Nigerian cities has become nightmarishly difficult.

But beyond the inconveniences of waiting in never-ending cues at petrol stations, the situation has been fatal for some. A few days ago, it was reported that a family died of fire that resulted from poorly stored petrol.

As you can imagine the difficulties of a petrol-less life extends to the world of writing. Yesterday, Obinna Udenwe—author of Satans and Shaitans—took to Facebook to talk about how the on-going fuel scarcity is complicating his life as a writer.

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To all the writers in Nigeria struggling to go about their daily writing hustle due to fuel scarcity, we commiserate with you. Feel free to tell us your experience in the comment section. We wish you the best and hope the scarcity ends soon.

This Battabox video captures just how ugly the situation is:

 

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Author image by Ake Art and Book Festival 
Petrol Station cue via Bellanaija.com

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I hold a doctorate in English from Duke University and recently joined the Marquette University English faculty as an Assistant Professor. I love teaching African fiction and contemporary British novels. Brittle Paper is the virtual space/station where I play and experiment with ideas on how to reinvent African fiction and literary culture.

4 Responses to “Obinna Udenwe | On Being a “Writer in a Petrol-less Nation”” Subscribe

  1. Obinna Udenwe 2016/04/08 at 10:26 #

    Oh, thanks Brittle Paper for putting this up here – so far it has been a tough one living in Nigeria – there are few vehicles on the road, transport fares have skyrocketed unbelievably, the black market thrives and security agencies shot and killed some citizens they perceived to be marketing petrol by the roadside (such a shame).

    As I type this, only a few petrol stations are open for business in Abakaliki where I live and only a few vehicles are on the road. My car hasn’t left the compound for two days. And our President, who made himself the petroleum minister hasn’t said anything.

  2. Ainehi Edoro 2016/04/08 at 10:46 #

    Sounds awful. Hang in there my dear friend. I’m really hoping the scarcity ends soon.

  3. Celestine Chimmumunefenwuanya 2016/04/08 at 13:26 #

    Obinna, 230 and you scream? down here in Ohaukwu borough its whooping 320 naira a litre. I had gloried in the crest of Buhari’s change and now am not find things funny and phenominally draining. Oga Obi sorry ooo. i popped in cos i can relate to it

  4. Nwanne Agwu 2016/04/16 at 16:51 #

    We should just keep up with it and pray it doesn’t become normal. The petroleum minister or head dictator is really making things change. Trike riders are making money here in Abakaliki. If don’t want it, then trek on…

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I hold a doctorate in English from Duke University and recently joined the Marquette University English faculty as an Assistant Professor. I love teaching African fiction and contemporary British novels. Brittle Paper is the virtual space/station where I play and experiment with ideas on how to reinvent African fiction and literary culture.

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