When death wrung the lights out
of your eyes,
dear child, Mother nature
became dumb—
struck by the acres of silence
between us.

The clouds have since turned grey
and horizons now bleed.
Light rays
are trapped in dusty dusks
And the skies weep.

Our history has become history,
memories greyed
Into nothingness.
Our songs unsung,
fade into oblivion’s emptiness.

Pain is grey paint
that clings to my soul
like dust to shoe soles
during harmattan.
Starships fail to fly
and Coke bottles cannot open happiness;
our dreams are now weakened phoenixes
buried in ashen fireplaces.

Moments we shared
have now become just memories
framed in photographs.

Since your heart stopped beating,
I have folded mine
Into origami
And shreded my
pain,
faith,
fate,
into smithereens,
like confetti

 

********

Post image by Thomas’s Pics via Flickr

About the Author:

Portrait - UdofaAma Udofa is a third year student of University of Nigeria, where he studies Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. He is someone who, awed by the beauty of what words can do, pursues a lifelong romance with them. He is of the opinion that Eba and Afang soup is life’s greatest gift to man. He recently launched Writivision.com, an online magazine blog for entertainment and literature.

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I hold a doctorate in English from Duke University and recently joined the Marquette University English faculty as an Assistant Professor. I love teaching African fiction and contemporary British novels. Brittle Paper is the virtual space/station where I play and experiment with ideas on how to reinvent African fiction and literary culture.

One Response to “Greying | by Ama Udofa | African Poetry” Subscribe

  1. Sihle 2016/05/26 at 04:37 #

    “Since your heart stopped beating, I have folded mine..And shreded my pain, faith, fate, into smithereens”

    The depth of these words.

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I hold a doctorate in English from Duke University and recently joined the Marquette University English faculty as an Assistant Professor. I love teaching African fiction and contemporary British novels. Brittle Paper is the virtual space/station where I play and experiment with ideas on how to reinvent African fiction and literary culture.

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