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For three weeks beginning on November 21, Brittle Paper will feature an essay series on feminism titled My Feminism.

The series was inspired, in part, by Chimamanda Adichie. In the past few weeks, the award-winning novelist has made a series of public statements that unleashed a wave of public interest in the politics, practice, and values of feminism. 

If you recall, Adichie shared a post on Facebook on how to raise a feminist daughter. She distinguished her sense and practice of feminism from that of Beyonce in a recent interview. She also launched a feminism-inspired beauty campaign for Boots cosmetics and even took feminism to the runway in a one-of-a-kind collaboration with Christian Dior.

With these statements, Adichie opened up a fertile ground for some of the most interesting conversations about feminism that we’ve witnessed in a long time. In order to keep the conversation going, Keside Anosike, Wana Udobang, Kola Tubosun, Pearl Osibu, and Ainehi Edoro have agreed to write short essays in which they explore feminism as a powerful idea that inspires us all differently

We will post two essays a week starting from Monday the 21st.

***

Essay 1: Complicating the Significance of Gender by Keside Anosike [read HERE]

Essay 2: The Unwomanly Feminist by Pearl Osibu [read HERE]

Essay 3:  “On the Necessity of Men” by Kola Tubosun [read HERE]

Essay 4: “Remembering to Scream” by Wana Udobang [read HERE]

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I hold a doctorate in English from Duke University and recently joined the Marquette University English faculty as an Assistant Professor. I love teaching African fiction and contemporary British novels. Brittle Paper is the virtual space/station where I play and experiment with ideas on how to reinvent African fiction and literary culture.

5 Responses to “November 21 | Brittle Paper Launches Essay Series on Feminism” Subscribe

  1. Seun IGE 2016/11/17 at 12:11 #

    Good thing to keep the conversation going.

    I think it would grand like if you had an open series also; where people are allowed to send it essays on feminism, which different perspectives. And you guys at Brittle Paper screen this essays, if they are worth it, publish online.
    This way the conversation blooms.

    It could even become a published collection of essays on feminism. With Adichie’s writing the forward. And her essay on how to raise children as the introduction to the book.

  2. Ainehi Edoro 2016/11/17 at 15:42 #

    Hi Seun. Thanks of your suggestion. You’re definitely on to something. There are a few others like yourself who would to see the project opened up to the broader community. Can you send me an email so we can continue the conversation? Let me know if you’re interested in helping organize a follow up essay series.

  3. Seun IGE 2016/11/21 at 14:11 #

    Great thing an Ainehi.
    My Email: ffrancisige at yahoo dot com. And, I would love to help. Thank you.

  4. Temi 2016/11/23 at 11:22 #

    Dear Brittle Paper,

    Are you still accepting essays? I would love to contribute to the series.

    Thanks.

  5. Ainehi Edoro 2016/11/25 at 13:05 #

    Hi Temi,

    Thanks so much for your interesting. Due to popular demand, I plan on running an open version of the series where the whole community will be invited to submit essays. Look out for the announcement. Also I’ve taken down your email and will send you the invite personally.

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I hold a doctorate in English from Duke University and recently joined the Marquette University English faculty as an Assistant Professor. I love teaching African fiction and contemporary British novels. Brittle Paper is the virtual space/station where I play and experiment with ideas on how to reinvent African fiction and literary culture.

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