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Kudos to the folks at Golden Baobab for all the light they are shining on African children’s books. The Golden Baobab Prize awarded to the best African children’s book is in its 7th edition, and we are delighted to share with you the list of winners.

The prize is one of the platforms established by the Golden Baobab Foundation, a Ghana-based organization that enjoys the support of a many in the African literary community, including Ama Ata Aidoo and Maya Ajmera.

The prize was stablished to fill the conspicuous absence of a literary market and culture around African children’s books. That is why the award is designed to give writers publishing opportunity. The stories and illustrations entered for the prize are previously unpublished. Winning the award comes with a 5000 dollar prize and a publishing contract.

Deborah Ahenkorah Osei-Agyekum, the Director of Golden Baobab, see the pool of talent attracted by the prize as incentive to continue to create “more publishing partnerships and opportunities for our writers to get more African books into the hands of children.”

Congrats the winners! Below are list of shortlisted authors and winners.

Those shortlisted were:

The Golden Baobab Prize for Early Chapter Books

  • Maya and the Finish Line by Ayo Oyeku from Nigeria
  • Lights and Freedom by Khethiwe Mndawe from South Africa

The Golden Baobab Prize for Picture Books

  • A Dark Night for Wishes by Kai Tuomi from South Africa
  • Mr. Cocka-Rocka-Roo by Lori-Ann Preston from South Africa

 

Winners:

  • The Ama-zings! by Lori-Ann Preston from South Africa, Winner of the Golden Baobab Prize for Early Chapter Books.
  • Kita and the Red, Dusty Road by Vennessa Scholtz from South Africa, Winner of the Golden Baobab Prize for Picture Books.

 

 

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I hold a doctorate in English from Duke University and recently joined the Marquette University English faculty as an Assistant Professor. I love teaching African fiction and contemporary British novels. Brittle Paper is the virtual space/station where I play and experiment with ideas on how to reinvent African fiction and literary culture.

One Response to “The Winners of the 2017 Golden Baobab Prize for African Children’s Books” Subscribe

  1. Hannah 2016/12/20 at 05:25 #

    Congrats to them! It was confusing, though, to see that the winners were not included on the shortlists.

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I hold a doctorate in English from Duke University and recently joined the Marquette University English faculty as an Assistant Professor. I love teaching African fiction and contemporary British novels. Brittle Paper is the virtual space/station where I play and experiment with ideas on how to reinvent African fiction and literary culture.

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