4508216378_e354b0061d_o

We heard them say,
“These things you seek are fantasies dashed against the wall of obvious reason,
with each falling piece losing touch with its glue formed from doubts.”

We heard them say,
“Tomorrow’s light is a flickering spark
Whose shooting rays will be absorbed into the thick layer of flowing care that will never go to rest.”

We heard them say,
“Put it all together, try all you can, engaging every loose muscle,
whip up all the courage
Maybe someday you’ll see why it will not be what you think you see.”

We heard them,
They said it,
They meant it.

We hear them saying,
“The forest floor has its paths,
Printed from the feet of walking men
Men who walked and walked and walked
Walking the walk through their wondering minds
Till they found their wandering walk fastened in the earth’s skull making fine routes.”

We hear them saying,
“Not many will know how many of these who entrenched their routes
We will place in-between their dreams;
The question of worth and self;
And we will show in repeated repetitive repetition the density of the forest tops.
We will sit on the faces of bills by the first plant and shout, ‘No!'”

We have been standing still for a time,
While we wallowed in troubled thoughts;
We printed out our first dot,
Dots made from dear fear;
We now know there are struggles, and we groan.
It beats from our guts, we hear it;
It’s clear after each burst—
So we say,
“Kadima!”
We hear it:
“Kadima!”
After each step we shout through our pores:
“Kadima!”
Till we raise calabashes to toast our entrenched routes,
It will be:
“Kadima!”

 

 

**************

Post image by gorfor via Flickr.

About the Author:

KOFI-SEY-1Benjamin Obu-Simpson hails from Agona Nyakrom, a village in the Central Region of Ghana. He studied at the University of Cape Coast. He is a teacher, and takes on writing as an extension of his reach. He is also an editor and spends time coaching young and upcoming writers. You can reach him on Twitter @KofiSeySimpson

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One Response to “Kadima! | By Benjamin Obu-Simpson | Poetry” Subscribe

  1. Yasky 2017/03/02 at 02:22 #

    Splendid!!

    But I fear, this poem should be listened to, not read

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I hold a doctorate in English from Duke University and recently joined the Marquette University English faculty as an Assistant Professor. I love teaching African fiction and contemporary British novels. Brittle Paper is the virtual space/station where I play and experiment with ideas on how to reinvent African fiction and literary culture.

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