Photo credit: Olisa TV.

In the light of recent developments in the ever-volatile Nigerian political space, 27 writers, some of them among the best-known in the country, have put out a joint statement condemning hate speech across ethnic lines.

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We, the undersigned Nigerian writers, view with grave concern the dominance of ethnic incendiary speech in our country. We are deeply troubled that the public space – both online and offline – has been hijacked by a vocal minority of individuals who promote ethnocentric ideas inimitable to the peace and well being of a majority of citizens. Nigerian citizens have a right to freely express their opinions on governance as enshrined in the Constitution. However, this fundamental right of freedom of speech is being used to disseminate hate speech, which goes contrary to the right itself and the spirit of the Constitution that enshrines it.

Nigeria is a federated state with over 250 ethnic groups and 500 languages. The survival of our 170 million people lies in our ability to curtail conflicting ethnic tensions. We have, however, had instances of conflict along ethno-religious lines, most notably the civil war in the period 1967 to 1970 which saw millions of Nigerian citizens killed. The “us” against “them” rhetoric that ignited bloodshed of a bestial magnitude since independence has re-surfaced again. A new breed of ethnic entrepreneurs seem hell-bent on causing anarchy for political motives. The lessons of our history are being ignored. Strength in diversity is considered weakness.

We, as writers, are aware of the effects of such parochial politics in our continent: the ethnic tensions in the early 1970’s in Zambia, the animus of ethnic hate in post-apartheid South Africa, the horrors of the Rwandan genocide, the ongoing displacement and insecurity in Burundi and parts of the Democratic Republic of Congo, the post-election ethnic killings in Kenya, etc, are markers of warning of note.

We strongly believe that no amount of social grievance against the government can justify this level of irresponsible ethnocentric hatred currently being peddled by a growing number of disgruntled groups in this country. Similarly, we are mortified by the initial nonchalance and apparent misguided handling by the authorities of the root cause of hate speech in the country.

We condemn this growing trend of hate speech in the strongest terms.

Freedom of speech, though sacrosanct, is not absolute. Our freedom is a shared one, limited by the freedom of others. Citizens must draw the line between free speech and arbitrary spite. For a multi-ethnic state with fault lines such as ours, the lasting solution lies in healing the cleavages that promote ethnic division. This also means the triumph of a national identity that transcends the opportunistic ethnocentric group identity, which has been the bane of Nigeria’s nationhood. Clearly, we cannot pretend that all is well with our “federation”. We assert that our union can only be saved by transparency, frankness and a deliberate revision of structures and relations. Because of the lack of boldness and the inactions of the past, we have a bad deal of a leprous nation in our hands. As writers, we insist, that there should be no prevarication in this matter. We reiterate the call for the restructuring of Nigeria in a manner of true federalism.

We also call on the government of Nigeria to do everything in its power to protect her citizens and avert another spate of useless killings, and to listen to all aggrieved segments in a constructive and productive manner. It is the duty of government to make the country livable just as it is for citizens to work in building a country to which we are all happy to belong. This means an interrogation of our national memory, reinstating the teaching of a thorough curriculum of Nigerian history in primary and secondary schools, a celebration of our individual cultures and languages, and, above all, the application of  justice where rights have been violated.

Nigeria’s democracy, attained through great sacrifice and loss, now faces its most crucial test of ensuring that citizens are safe wherever they choose to reside, be it in the north-east, north-west, north-central, south-east, south-west, or south-south.

Thus, we condemn hate speech or ethnic-based politics or activism that seeks to challenge the right of Nigerians to live, work, or associate in peace anywhere in the country. We also call on all Nigerians to unite and face our common enemies – those who have sworn to destroy our common wealth. We stand for open association and peaceful engagement and the nurturing of diversity. In insisting on this, we, as writers, stand for a secure country with a just society worthy of all our aspirations.

 

Signed:

Nwachukwu Egbunike ∙ Kola Tubosun ∙ Ikhide R. Ikheloa ∙ Chiagozie Fred Nwonwu ∙ Niran Okewole ∙ Tade Ipadeola ∙ Richard Ali ∙ Abubakar Adam Ibrahim ∙ Servio Gbadamosi ∙ Su’eddie Vershima Agema ∙ Sylva Nze Ifedigbo ∙ Tope Folarin ∙ Tunde Leye ∙ Uchenna Ekwerenmadu ∙ Remi Raji ∙ Rọ́pò Ewéńlá ∙ Ikenna Ndu ∙ Dami Ajayi ∙ Ayodele Olofintuade ∙ Chika Unigwe ∙ Abimbola Adunni Adelakun ∙ Ukamaka Olisakwe ∙ Eghosa Imasuen ∙ Temitayo Olofinlua ∙ Terseer Sam Baki ∙ Femi Morgan ∙ Jumoke Verissimo

June 28, 2017.

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2 Responses to “Ethnic Hate Speech: Statement from Concerned Nigerian Writers” Subscribe

  1. Simeon Mpamugoh 2017/06/30 at 09:52 #

    I join in this call for the excision of all forms of injustice and hatred in this God blessed but taken for granted country.

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  1. As Ethnic Hate Speech Rises, Nigerian Writers Push Back - 2017/07/14

    […] concerned about the escalating tensions from different ethnic groups in the country, released a public statement condemning this rising trend of ethnocentric hate speech. Some of the writers include […]

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I hold a doctorate in English from Duke University and recently joined the Marquette University English faculty as an Assistant Professor. I love teaching African fiction and contemporary British novels. Brittle Paper is the virtual space/station where I play and experiment with ideas on how to reinvent African fiction and literary culture.

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