Enkare Review is currently open for submissions.

The magazine’s Issue 1 was released in April and included an interview with The New Yorker editor David Remnick.

Since its founding in August 2016, the magazine has published such notable names as Junot Diaz, Nnedi Okoroafor, Maaza Mengiste, Namwali Serpell, and Ikhide Ikheloa.

The cover of Enkare Review’s Issue 1.

Read their submission guidelines below, as published on their Website.

  • All submissions must be in English. Pieces translated into English from other languages will be accepted and this must be indicated in the cover letter and emailed alongside the submission to submissions@enkare.org or via our Submission Form.
  • All submissions must have previously been unpublished. Unpublished in this case includes books, print and online magazines and journals.
  • All submissions must be accompanied by a bio of not more than 200 words pasted in the body of the email. DO NOT attach your bio as a separate document.
  • All manuscripts should be submitted as Word documents (doc, docx) for ease of reading and editing. Do NOT paste the text of your work as part of the body of the email.
  • Submissions should be typed in TIMES NEW ROMAN, FONT 12, DOUBLE SPACED and LEFT ALIGNED. For more information on how to format your manuscript, look at the Proper Manuscript Format by William Shunn. Failure to adhere to this will lead to your manuscript not being read by our editors.
  • The first page of your manuscript must contain YOUR NAME, EMAIL ADDRESS and TITLE OF THE WORK BEING SUBMITTED.
  • For Fiction, and Nonfiction submissions should be between 2,500 to 7500 words. For Poetry, please submit NO LESS THAN 4 POEMS but NO MORE THAN 7 POEMS.  ALL the poems MUST be contained in a single document and submitted as such.
  • Adherence to the word limit is recommended but in any case, we will bend this a little bit if it makes sense to surpass the word limit for the story or essay or poem to make complete sense. Don’t hold back.
  • Simultaneous submissions are acceptable and all we request is that we are notified when the submission is accepted for publication elsewhere.
  • As a suggestion, you are encouraged to read pieces that have previously appeared on Enkare Review to get a grasp of the kind of submissions we are looking for.
  • Please submit NO MORE THAN one piece of work at a time. Wait for our response on your submission before sending in another.
  • Due to the large volume of submissions that we receive, we aim to respond to submissions within THREE MONTHS after the close of the submission period. We will notify you within that period if your submission has been accepted for publication. If you don’t hear from us within that period,  send us a query to info@enkare.org.

Find out more on their Website.

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About Otosirieze Obi-Young

View all posts by Otosirieze Obi-Young
Otosirieze Obi-Young’s writing has been shortlisted for the 2016 Miles Morland Writing Scholarship, the 2017 Gerald Kraak Award, and nominated for a 2015 Pushcart Prize. His fiction has appeared in Transition (“A Tenderer Blessing,” 2015), The Threepenny Review (“Mulumba,” 2016), and Pride and Prejudice: African Perspectives on Gender, Social Justice and Sexuality (“You Sing of a Longing,” 2017), an anthology of The Jacana Literary Foundation and The Other Foundation. His work further appears in Interdisciplinary Academic Essays, Africa in Dialogue, and Brittle Paper, where he is submissions editor. He is the editor of the Art Naija Series: a sequence of concept-based e-anthologies of writing and visual art focusing on different aspects of Nigerianness. The first anthology, Enter Naija: The Book of Places (Oct., 2016) focuses on cities. The second, Work Naija: The Book of Vocations (June, 2017) focuses on professions. He attended the University of Nigeria, Nsukka and currently teaches English at another Nigerian university. When bored, he blogs pop culture at naijakulture.blogspot.com or just Googles Rihanna.

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I hold a doctorate in English from Duke University and recently joined the Marquette University English faculty as an Assistant Professor. I love teaching African fiction and contemporary British novels. Brittle Paper is the virtual space/station where I play and experiment with ideas on how to reinvent African fiction and literary culture.

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