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#CainePrize2017 | Review of Magogodi Makhene’s “The Virus” | By Ebenezer Agu

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It is a Brittle Paper tradition to review the five stories shortlisted for the Caine Prize. Through this, we hope to open up conversations around the stories, to find out what is interesting or innovative about them. Following our first, second and third reviews, we bring you our fourth #CainePrize2017 story review: Magogodi Makhene’s “The Virus.” Magogodi oaMphela […]

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Soft Notes and Love Notes | A Review of Odafe Atógun’s Taduno’s Song | By Kọ́lá Túbọ̀sún

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  Title: Taduno’s Song Author: Odafe Atógun Pages: 219 Publisher: Ouida Books/CanonGate Year: 2017 Where to buy: ouidabook.com and amazon Odafe Atógun will insist, when asked, that his debut novel Taduno’s Song is NOT a love story but a political one. He will insist, as he did during a book chat I had with him and […]

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#CainePrize2017 | Review of Bushra al-Fadil’s “The Story of the Girl Whose Birds Flew Away” | By D. E. Benson

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It is an annual Brittle Paper tradition to review the five stories shortlisted for the Caine Prize. Through this, we hope to open up conversations around the stories, to find out what is interesting or innovative about them. Following the announcement of the 2017 shortlist, we published our first and second reviews. We bring you our third […]

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#CainePrize2017 | Review of Chikodili Emelumadu’s “Bush Baby” | By Innocent Chizaram Ilo

brittle paper reviews

It is a Brittle Paper tradition to review the five stories shortlisted for the Caine Prize. Through this, we hope to open up conversations around the stories, to find out what is interesting or innovative about them. After last week’s opener, following the announcement of the shortlist, we bring you our second #CainePrize2017 story review: Chikodili Emelumadu “Bush Baby.” […]

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A Narrative of Home and Longing | Review of Inua Ellams’ #Afterhours | By Billie McTernan

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In his new anthology-cum-diary-cum-memoir, #Afterhours, Nigerian poet Inua Ellams features a collection of poems written in-response to a well-considered selection of British and Irish poems (and poets) published between 1984, the year the author was born, and 2002, the year he turned 18. Having lived in the UK and Ireland from his teen years Ellams […]

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#CainePrize2017 | Review of Arinze Ifeakandu’s “God’s Children Are Little Broken Things” | By Kelechi Njoku

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As you probably already know, the Caine Prize for African Writing shortlist is out. It’s created quite a lot of buzz and excitement in the last few days. While we are still celebrating with the shortlistees, we also think it’s time to get serious and talk about these stories. Are they any good? What is […]

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Dystopia in Many Words | Review of Lauren Beukes’ Slipping | By Kola Tubosun

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Lauren Beukes loves dystopia, or has at least has spent a lot of time thinking about it. A number of stories in her latest collection, titled Slipping, examine dire futuristic scenarios, from hyper-commercialization of television to exploitative medical sciences to biotech advertising to air travel — all of them packing sufficient decibels of discomfiture, in […]

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Joe Ruzvidzo’s Behind Enemy Lines Explores the Lives of Ordinary People and Anti-heroes

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Sometime in the middle of last year, we published this story about an adorable little boy taking a flight of fancy into the world of espionage and battle. That story, titled “Behind Enemy Lines,” is now the headline story in a lovely little collection of stories by Zimbabwean writer Joe Ruzvidzo. Behind Enemy Lines and […]

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I hold a doctorate in English from Duke University and recently joined the Marquette University English faculty as an Assistant Professor. I love teaching African fiction and contemporary British novels. Brittle Paper is the virtual space/station where I play and experiment with ideas on how to reinvent African fiction and literary culture.

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#TBT | An Ode to Makeup | The Full Transcript of Chimamanda Adichie’s Wellesley Speech

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Our #TBT feature this week is Chimamanda Adichie’s Wellesley speech. Two years ago, Adichie gave the commencement speech at Wellesley […]

The Impossibly Dapper Novelist: A Look at Alain Mabanckou’s Style File

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From Chimamanda Adichie’s widely-publicized made-in-Nigeria wardrobe to Teju Cole’s Ikire Jones scarves to Prof Ato Quayson’s fedora hats, fashion and […]

Keeping Up With African Writers: Aminatta Forna

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  Among writers of her generation, Aminatta Forna belongs in the higher ranks of critical acclaim. With her work translated […]

Why Maaza Mengiste Threw Away the First Draft of Her Second Novel

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Maaza Mengiste might have just one novel published so far, in 2010, but she is one of the most visible […]

Chimamanda Adichie at City of Columbia’s Books In Bloom Festival | By Arao Ameny

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The city of Columbia, Maryland—a city located midway between Washington D.C. and Baltimore—hosted its first literary festival ‘Books in Bloom’ […]

Leila Aboulela Headlines 2017 Kaduna Book and Arts Festival

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Hold on, Ake Festival. KABAFEST is here! Yes, we are delighted to announce the inaugural edition of the Kaduna Book […]