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Easter Reading Gift: Granta Just Unlocked Taiye Selasi’s Classic 2011 Short Story “The Sex Lives of African Girls”

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Before her acclaimed debut novel Ghana Must Go dropped in 2013, we first had a taste of Taiye Selasi’s fiction in 2011, in a short story published in Granta‘s Summer 2011 The F Word issue, a breathlessly musical thing titled “The Sex Lives of African Girls.” Told in the second person, and centered around a young girl’s observation […]

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Pepper Soup Anthology Presents 12 Unique Takes on Happily Ever After

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If you are in the mood for stories assembled around the idea of love as it relates to women’s lives, you’ll enjoy Pepper Soup. Timendu Aghahowa who edited the volume has done a fine job of collecting a set of delicious stories inspired by the travails and triumphs of women in everyday scenarios.  The collection includes […]

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Tope Folarin’s LA Review Essay is a Race and Matatu “Dream” with Ngugi and Venus Williams

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2013 Caine Prize winner Tope Folarin has a new essay in the Los Angeles Review of Books. The piece, titled “An Architect of Dreams: On Ngugi wa Thiong’o’s Devil on the Cross,” touches upon a number of diverse topics including Venus Williams, dreams, racism, matatu, barbershops, and of course, Ngugi wa Thiong’o. Folarin’s keen eye […]

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African Literary Digest: 9 Must-Reads from March, 2017

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Every month, we compile a list of reads from around the Internet that we find illuminating. For January, we chose eight pieces. For February, we picked fourteen pieces. For March, we have settled on nine. They include fiction pieces that we believe are among the best we will see this year, essays that are strong contributions […]

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Namwali Serpell’s The New Yorker Essay Reveals the Satire in Zambia’s “Afronaut” Legend

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Last week, The New Yorker published a heavily-researched essay by Namwali Serpell in its Culture Desk section. Titled “The Zambian ‘Afronaut’ Who Wanted To Join the Space Race,” it is a revealing profile of Edward Mukuka Nkoloso who, as Zambia gained independence from Britain in 1964 at the height of the Cold War, launched, with […]

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African Literary Digest: 14 Must-Reads from February, 2017

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Every month, we compile a list of reads from around the internet that we find illuminating. For January, we chose eight pieces. For February, we have fourteen items. They include non-fiction, fiction, essays, speeches, and even tweets. While numbered, this list is unranked. *** 1. “Since Everything Was Suddening into a Hurricane” | By Binyavanaga Wainaina | Granta | Non-fiction […]

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Jennifer Emelife’s Six Questions for the Nigerian Writers’ Awards Ceremony

Early this year, we shared a list of “The 100 Most Influential Nigerian Writers under 40” compiled by a body called the Nigerian Writers’ Awards (NWA). The title raised a good bit of controversy for readers who criticized the inclusion of songwriters and popular culture bloggers in a list celebrating writers. But if anyone was amused […]

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A Shared Sea: Tsitsi Dangarembga and Zora Neale Hurston | By Salimah Valiani

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  Tsitsi Dangarembga’s 1988 novel, Nervous Conditions, the story of Tambudzai, other girl-children, and women of Babamukuru’s family in 1970s British Rhodesia, begins this way: I was not sorry when my brother died. Nor am I apologizing for my callousness, as you may define it, my lack of feeling. For it is not that at […]

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I hold a doctorate in English from Duke University and recently joined the Marquette University English faculty as an Assistant Professor. I love teaching African fiction and contemporary British novels. Brittle Paper is the virtual space/station where I play and experiment with ideas on how to reinvent African fiction and literary culture.

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Is Fiston Mujila’s Tram 83 Misogynist Poverty Porn? Zukiswa Wanner and Richard Oduku Lead Strong Reaction to Ikhide Ikheloa’s Damning Criticism

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In August 2014, Congolese author Fiston Mwanza Mujila’s debut French-language novel, Tram 83, was released to rapturous acclaim in France. By […]

Roses and War | By Jonathan Otamere Endurance | Poetry

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Prayers are symphonies of lamentation That begin from my mother’s lips, Like a bird beginning a day’s death, With a […]

Fear Woman | By Immanuel James Ibe-Anyanwu | Fiction

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  Irritated by our presence, the guard swatted us off the entrance gate with his baton, his face ugly with […]

An Ecofeminist Drawing New Language from Nature and His Anima | Q&A with Saddiq Dzukogi, 2017 Brunel International Poetry Prize Shortlistee

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Saddiq Dzukogi was recently shortlisted for the 2017 Brunel International Poetry Prize. We published his poem, “Collect Rainwater,” in February. Saddiq […]

Chimamanda Adichie’s Best Looks from the Dear Ijeawele Book Tour

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Over the last two months, Chimamanda Adichie has been on the road publicizing her new book Dear Ijeawele. She’s spoken […]

#BlackGirlMagic: Sisonke Msimang’s Essay on Adichie Is a Brilliant Dissection of How Black Female Celebs Are Praised and Criticized

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In the last five years, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie has come to occupy a unique place in the pop culture conversation: […]