Bitter Kola, Saltwater and Other Remedies | By Gbolahan Badmus | An Ebola Story

  It all began on a Monday afternoon. I was walking home from work with a newly acquired headache. No big deal really except that I learned, early the same morning, that the virus had spread to the neighborhood where my workplace was situated. I had decided to avoid bodily contacts, even handshakes. But the rush [...]

“Order in the Mother City” | Walls | By Jennifer Thorpe | A Feminist Poem

It was The force of the wall That propelled her face forward And back into the foot That kicked it. The kicker danced The dance of a victorious soldier. For he was a warrior in a long standing campaign Of dominance And hate. Behind the wall, And hidden from view, A young girl played on [...]

“His Passion Began to Drive us Slightly Mad” | Ben Okri on Bibliomania

Bibliomania is a pathological and irrational desire to collect books, not to be mistaken with bibliophilia, a healthy love for books. I was rereading Ben Okri’s Famished Road recently and came across this bit on Azaro’s father exhibiting full blown bibliomania, a strange, feverish desire for book he couldn’t read, books about things he could [...]

Conceptual Analysis of M. I. Abaga’s King James

The world of music is a game of thrones, right? And you play to win or die. If there’s anyone who knows the truth of this statement, it’s M. I. In his latest single, titled “King James,” he speaks about this violence lying at the heart of any high-stake hustle, whether it’s entertainment or politics. Of [...]

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African Writers of the Eighteenth Century | Excerpted from Black Orpheus

When we think of 18th century writers of African descent who lived and worked in Europe, Olaudah Equiano comes to mind. Well, there were others. This anonymous piece I found while rummaging through the digital collection of Black Orpheus at my school’s library mentions a few other names.  In case you were wondering, Black Orpheus is an [...]

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My Corner of Town | By Roland Ndu Akpe | A Poem

My Corner of Town Houses in my corner of town have lost shape long before obesity became ill health Tell Iya Mujidat her house has lost all affection for me and I for it.   Water marks on these lowly ceilings slowly broadening in opposite direction to the shrinking of Lake Chad trace the speed [...]

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Bitter Kola, Saltwater and Other Remedies | By Gbolahan Badmus | An Ebola Story

  It all began on a Monday afternoon. I was walking home from work with a newly acquired headache. No big deal really except that I learned, early the same morning, that the virus had spread to the neighborhood where my workplace was situated. I had decided to avoid bodily contacts, even handshakes. But the rush [...]

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Adorable Moment as Soyinka Meets Soyinka

The XYZ Show is a Nairobi-based political satire featuring life-size latex puppets. Recently, they shared photographs of Wole Soyinka meeting a life-size puppet of himself. Soyinka looks happy and rather impressed. It looks like they’re having a conversation. Wouldn’t we have liked to eavesdrop. 

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Five Mind-bending and Mood-altering African Novels

  Sleepwalking Land (1999) by Mia Cuto, Mozambique  A boy and an old man are survivors in a post-apocalyptic, war-ravaged town. They stumble upon a burned-out bus and decide to make it home. While clearing out the corpses trapped and burned in the bus, they find a journal kept by one of the dead passengers, [...]

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“A Small Undisclosed Gesture” | Corkscrew | By Dami Ajayi | Flash Fiction

  There is a bottle of red wine, two wine flutes and no corkscrew in sight on the table between us. I watch your countenance change from grim concentration to befuddled puzzlement. This is not a trick; there are no aces up my sleeves, there is just the bottle of red wine needed to snuff [...]

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“Order in the Mother City” | Walls | By Jennifer Thorpe | A Feminist Poem

It was The force of the wall That propelled her face forward And back into the foot That kicked it. The kicker danced The dance of a victorious soldier. For he was a warrior in a long standing campaign Of dominance And hate. Behind the wall, And hidden from view, A young girl played on [...]

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“His Passion Began to Drive us Slightly Mad” | Ben Okri on Bibliomania

Bibliomania is a pathological and irrational desire to collect books, not to be mistaken with bibliophilia, a healthy love for books. I was rereading Ben Okri’s Famished Road recently and came across this bit on Azaro’s father exhibiting full blown bibliomania, a strange, feverish desire for book he couldn’t read, books about things he could [...]

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“She Was the Perfect Art” | Distance | By Carl Terver | A Vignette

It was a long trip from Akure. Three days ago Sade returned from the United States, and she ran to [...]

Ellen Banda on Writing Children’s Fiction | Interviewed by Caleb Adebayo

Ellen Banda-Aaku is a published and award-winning writer of books for children and short stories. Her first book for children, [...]

Ifemelu Comes to Life in Adichie’s New Blog

Last time, I brought you Adichie’s fashion blog—Chimamanda Style Files—managed by “her team.” Hopefully you’ve been popping by the blog [...]

Ngugi Is Favored to Win the Nobel Prize, Says Swedish Betting Firm

It’s barely a month before the next Noble Laureate is announced, so excitement is starting to build up. But for [...]

Slamming Binyavanga for Slamming the Caine Prize | by Obinna Udenwe

  In a time long forgot, a bird called Nza, one of the tiniest birds ever created by God, finished [...]

N. Bulawayo on Literary Success, Giving Back, and Writivism | Interviewed by Rebecca Rwakabukoza

NoViolet Bulawayo is a Zimbabwean author and Stegner Fellow at Stanford University. Her debut novel We Need New Names was [...]