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The 2017 Commonwealth Short Story Prize is now open for entries! If you are a member of any of the 50 countries within the commonwealth you can now enter. Regional winners receive £2,500 and the overall winner receives £5,000 from the competition, which is more diverse than any other literary competition.

Last year, The Prize attracted nearly 4000 entries from 47 countries. The global judging panel represent each of the five regions of the Commonwealth. Last year they selected author Parashar Kulkarni as their winner. He was the first Indian author to ever win the prize.

The competition is free. The Prize is awarded for the best unpublished short fiction in English written by a citizen of a Commonwealth country. All stories submitted must be unpublished (2,000–5,000 words), but published writers are also eligible to apply.

“Member of the Commonwealth” means that there is no requirement for the writer to have current residence in a Commonwealth country, providing she/he is a citizen of a Commonwealth country.

To submit your story, fill out this form.

For more information click HERE.

Deadline is November 1.

So hurry!

Best of luck

[Please NoteBrittle Paper is not responsible for the organization or further promotion of this prize, neither do we have a stake in its popularity. Address any inquiry to  writers@commonwealth.int. Thank you. ]

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Professional procrastinator, aspiring Jacquette of all trades. Literature and English Language student who likes to label herself as a "creative" without really knowing what the title holds. Studies at the University of Sheffield, UK. Born in Nigeria, age 20. Fashion and lifestyle blogger @queenofsheeba.uk

2 Responses to “Opportunity for African Writers | Enter to Win the 2017 Commonwealth Short Story Prize” Subscribe

  1. Brian 2016/10/27 at 11:18 #

    Hie.
    Is it only fiction stories expected?

  2. Moses Plangkat 2017/08/08 at 21:15 #

    Hello am interested to participate in this competition but need guidance please. thanks

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I hold a doctorate in English from Duke University and recently joined the Marquette University English faculty as an Assistant Professor. I love teaching African fiction and contemporary British novels. Brittle Paper is the virtual space/station where I play and experiment with ideas on how to reinvent African fiction and literary culture.

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