Tag Archives: buchi emecheta

“Like Listening to an Aunt” | Read Sefi Atta’s Solid Tribute to Buchi Emecheta

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Following the passing of Buchi Emecheta on January 26 at the age of 72, there has been an outburst of beautiful, heartfelt tributes to a woman considered to be an icon in her personal and professional lives. Nigerian novelist Sefi Atta wrote this solid one in KTravula. Read an excerpt below. The first time I […]

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“Thank You for Your Courage” | African Writers Pay Tribute to Buchi Emecheta

emecheta obituary

On January 26, Nigerian author Buchi Emecheta passed away at the age of 72. [read here if you missed it.] Fellow authors took to social media to celebrate her life and the significance of her work. Chimamanda Adichie: Buchi Emecheta. We are able to speak because you first spoke. Thank you for your courage. Thank […]

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Buchi Emecheta, Nigerian Novelist and Playwright, Passes on at 72

emecheta obituary

The Nigerian novelist and playwright Buchi Emecheta has passed on at the age of 72. Born in 1944, the much beloved icon was one of the most influential black writers of the latter half of the twenty-first century. Often described as “the first successful black woman novelist living in Britain after 1948,” she made her […]

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The River and Femininity in Nigerian Literature | Review of Adeniyi’s On the Bank of the River | By Emilia J. Bryce

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In On the Bank of the River, Ifeoluwapo Adeniyi uses the experience of childhood to articulate important ideas about parenting, girl-child education, rural-urban encounters, and intergenerational tensions in Nigeria. The protagonist of the novel, Enitan, realizes that the constant sorrow that has become her mother’s personality is a product of a failed love affair, which […]

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2015: Brittle Paper’s African Literary Person of the Year

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In 1973, Wole Soyinka found himself in the English Department of a British university where certain prominent professors “did not believe in any such mythical beast as ‘African literature.’” Living in a world where people thought that Africa had nothing to offer in terms of forms and theories of storytelling, Soyinka and his generation had […]

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Dear Ms. Paper: Save Me From This Boring African Novel

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Dear Ms. Paper: Roughly two months ago, I decided to expand my cultural horizon. I curbed my obsession with Nollywood movies and thought I’d try reading African novels instead. A bookworm friend gave me a list of 6 novels. They all sounded the same to me, meaning boring and tiresome, so I decided to pick the […]

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Chasing Elusive Joy: The Trials and Tribulations of Good Women by Yejide Kilanko

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At 13, my days were divided between time away at a girls boarding school in Onitsha and holidays at home in Ibadan, Nigeria. I remember the year as an awkward one. We (my friends and I) were dealing with the physical and emotional rollercoaster of puberty while armed with the newly found knowledge that “boys […]

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Sex in African Novels Pt. 1: “Please, Ona, Don’t Wake the Whole Household.”

Emecheta Feature

The excerpt you about to read is from Buchi Emecheta’s 1980 novel Joys of Motherhood. It’s the debut post in a new Brittle Paper series called “Sex in African Novels.” Enjoy! Agbadi had slept so much in the day that, now he was feeling better, he was finding it difficult to sleep the night through. He must […]

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I hold a doctorate in English from Duke University and recently joined the Marquette University English faculty as an Assistant Professor. I love teaching African fiction and contemporary British novels. Brittle Paper is the virtual space/station where I play and experiment with ideas on how to reinvent African fiction and literary culture.

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Bessie Head’s Letters: the Pain, the Beauty, the Humor

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“Forgive the vanity, but few people equal my letter-writing ability!!” writes Bessie Head on March 14, 197o to her friend […]

Is Tram 83 Misogynist Poverty Porn? Petina Gappah, Tsitsi Dangarembga, Ainehi Edoro Deepen Conversation as Ikhide Ikheloa and Richard Oduku Publish New Essays

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Two days ago, we covered an important conversation that had started on Facebook in reaction to Ikhide Ikheloa’s essay in […]

A Letter of Secrets | By Nwanne Agwu | Fiction

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On the streets of Lagos, a boy searches for himself in mirrors. — Romeo Oriogun. Saturday, 01 April, 2017 Dear […]

Opportunity for African Writers | Submit to CODE’s 2017 Burt Award for African Young Adult Literature

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CODE have made a call for submissions to its 2017 Burt Award for African Young Adult Literature. The award replaces the […]

Wind | By Ayoola Goodness | Poetry

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because of you i have learnt how to make rainbows with my eyes. my eyes tossing the sun. but they […]

Sarah Ladipo Manyika’s Like a Mule Bringing Ice Cream to the Sun “Briefly Noted” in The New Yorker

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Sarah Ladipo Manyika’s second novel, Like a Mule Bringing Ice Cream to the Sun, has been featured in The New […]