Subscribe to Newsletter
Monthly Newsletter: Join more than 3,000 African literature enthusiasts!
Subscribe for African literature news, and receive a free copy of our "Guide to African Novels."

Renditions of Flight in Time

I n case you were wondering, Oron is not the name of a constellation even though it sounds like one.  Oron is a Nigerian border town where Chibuzor Okoroafor lives, attends the Nigerian maritime academy and writes poetry. Oron is “the land of aquatic splendor…a lovely estuary town, connecting the Atlantic… a wonderful place to be,” says Chibuzor in a Facebook message.  Chibuzor has a growing collection of poems he likes to share with his friends on Facebook. That’s how I first encountered his work. He describes his poems as  “very simple and approachable, deeply sentimental and sometimes witty.” My little addition is that Chibuzor’s poems are marked by an intensity of imagery that somehow does not get in the way of understanding the meaning of the poems and enjoying their wittiness and sentimentality. Brittle Paper is delighted to feature “Renditions of Flight II.”

 

Renditions of Flight II

by Chibuzor Okoroafor

Earth hangs on tides,
rarely waits as time changes.
Trendsetting outpaced trends.
In time, brogues and robes,
dialyzed rogues
as worms to a dead ego.

Time is
us – impatient, grown tots,
witty, passionate arch-androids.
Soulful-hum of transparent-art
hung over in-flight; unshelled
mollusc shuffling in space
to the rhythm of love
gyrating echoes of a triumphant past.
Reverential particles of residual dust
spiralling– a text
(double-) marking time.

Tags: , , , ,

15 Responses to “Renditions of Flight in Time” Subscribe

  1. yewande ogunnaike 2011/05/11 at 18:48 #

    So Refreshingly Eloquent! Well Done Friend.

  2. Lady J. Fingertips 2011/05/11 at 18:58 #

    Excellent write. Congratulations on being featured.

  3. Kiru Taye 2011/05/11 at 19:03 #

    Chibuzo, you write the kind of poetry i enjoy, succinct yet beautiful. Well done.

  4. Safranna 2011/05/11 at 19:25 #

    Pure Loveliness!! ~<3~

  5. Onyemobi Anyiwo 2011/05/11 at 19:31 #

    Proud of you bro! Igbo Kwenu!

  6. judith ibeh 2011/05/11 at 19:50 #

    his eloquence and style, always unique….nice

  7. Emmanuel Samson 2011/05/11 at 20:58 #

    I love this (he)art and these lines are my favorite:

    “Soulful-hum of transparent-art
    hung over in-flight; unshelled
    mollusc shuffling in space
    to the rhythm of love
    gyrating echoes of a triumphant past.”

    Keep them coming.

  8. Jeff Unaegbu 2011/05/12 at 14:58 #

    Totally absorbing. Keeps one in space. Makes one want to go for a holiday in the moon. And from there, look down on earth. Reminiscent of star trek and star dust movies. Showing that as unshelled molluscs we are shuffling undecidedly in space, marking time, even again and again. Physics is interwoven in the unseen embroidery that holds this poetry. Nice work. And like Samson said, “Keep it coming”, brother.

  9. ahmed maiwada 2011/05/13 at 05:31 #

    Fun poem, with all the trappings: sounds, coinage, imagery… The diction is that of a grown poet: carefully chosen the way God chose His people!

  10. Anon 2011/05/13 at 14:59 #

    That went right over my head…

    Too many dislocated sentences, makes it hard to follow what is being said and what mood the saying is in.

    Is he lauding the errant, fickle nature of the human psyche or berrating it?

  11. Sel 2011/05/13 at 20:37 #

    Interesting poem, what is the story behind this quote. It seems impossible that there wouldn’t be one:

    “And everything conspires to silence us” — Rilke

  12. Ainehi 2011/05/13 at 23:03 #

    Hey Sel. You can prolly tell by now that I am obsessed with Rilke 🙂 The line comes from The Duino Elegies. I can’t quite remember which specific book. But I’ll like to know what you think of the quote.

  13. Sel 2011/05/14 at 13:35 #

    “It seems
    our own impermanence is concealed from us.
    The trees stand firm, the houses we live in
    are still there. We alone
    flow past it all, an exchange of air. Everything conspires to silence us,
    partly with shame,
    partly with unspeakable hope”

    I suppose in a word, death is what the poet is speaking of. But not just the motions of it but of disappearing and of the bleak knowledge that we all must carry of this inevitable end.

    I think most Africans die like this twice and the first while we are even still “alive” in the biological sense.

    In this sense, ‘Unspeakable hope’ seems to be for the masochistic few who are willing to torture against the first dying.

  14. admin 2011/05/18 at 14:29 #

    Thanks Sel. Curious to know what you think of Rilke. Imagine the idea that humans are the only strangers in the world in which they live and that the rest of the world–trees, house, animals, etc–is ashamed of them. Rather unsettling I would say.

Trackbacks/Pingbacks

  1. Muses and Guns | Brittle Paper - 2011/06/16

    […] by Chibuzor Okoroafor: “Renditions of Flight II” var fbShare = {url: 'http://brittlepaper.com/2011/06/muses-guns/&#039;,size: 'large',}(function() {var […]

Leave a Reply

Welcome to Brittle Paper, your go-to site for African writing and literary culture. We bring you all the latest news and juicy updates on publications, authors, events, prizes, and lifestyle. Follow us on Twitter and Instagram (@brittlepaper) and sign up for our "I love African Literature" newsletter.

Monthly Newsletter!

Subscribe for African literature news, and receive a free copy of our
"Guide to African Novels."

Archives

Photos | Pages & Palette Hosts Reading of Frankie Edozien’s Lives of Great Men in Abuja

Lives of Great Men - Frankie Edozien at Pages & Palette -- photo by Victor Adewale (9)

Last December, Abuja bookstore Pages & Palette hosted a reading of Chike Frankie Edozien’s memoir Lives of Great Men. Published […]

Mauritanian Blogger Mohamed Mkhaïtir Has Now Been in Jail for 5 Years

mohamed mkhaitir

In December 2013, Mauritanian blogger Mohamed Mkhaïtir wrote a blogpost criticizing his country’s government for using religion to discriminate against minorities. […]

Read Chapter One of Chigozie Obioma’s An Orchestra of Minorities

an orchestra of minorities - graph

Chigozie Obioma’s second novel An Orchestra of Minorities was published this January. As part of The Summer Library’s “selected extracts from […]

Laila Lalami’s Fourth Novel, The Other Americans, Is a Family Saga, a Murder Mystery, and a Love Story

laila lalami - alchetron - graph

Laila Lalami’s new novel is forthcoming on 26 March 2019 from Pantheon, an imprint of Penguin Random House. The 320-page […]

Thursday’s Children: 11 Contributors to Forthcoming Anthology Discuss Experimentation and the Nature of Creative Nonfiction

thursday's children - graph

Thursday’s Children is a forthcoming anthology of personal essays. Co-edited by Adams Adeosun and Bello Damilare, it comes with an […]

Clickbait | Saddiq Dzukogi | Poetry

image by Esther Vargas from flickr

Inspired by the Western media coverage of the Dusit Hotel terror attack in Nairobi.   At the Dusit restaurant in […]

Thanks for signing up!

Never miss out on new posts. Subscribe to a digest, too:

No thanks, I only want the monthly newsletter.