Subscribe to Newsletter
Monthly Newsletter: Join more than 3,000 African literature enthusiasts!
Subscribe for African literature news, and receive a free copy of our "Guide to African Novels."

Nnedi Okorafor is known for building fictional worlds from elements drawn from African culture and narratives. Her recent contribution to the Star Wars: From a Point of View anthology is no different.

To celebrate the 4oth anniversary of the Star Wars series, a group of writers were commissioned to write stories from the point of view of supporting, lesser known characters.  Okorafor’s story is titled “Baptist” and tells the story of a trash compactor from a race of creatures called Dianoga. The Dianoga are a pre-historic species in the Star Wars series known to feed on organic waste.

In a recent interview, Okorafor revealed that the name of her character is Omi, which in Yoruba means water. This is yet another instance of Okoforar channeling an aspect of African culture into her sci-fi stories.

Asked what inspired Omi’s characterization: Okorafor says:

“I was thinking about octopuses. I was thinking about their intelligence and how it evolved from a different line than the intelligence of human beings and how that makes them so alien to us (pun not intended, but I’ll happily own it).”

Congrats to Okorafor for taking part in such a wonderful project.

By the way, the anthology is out. Want to read Okorafor’s story? You can download the anthology HERE.

Tags: , ,

I hold a doctorate in English from Duke University and recently joined the Marquette University English faculty as an Assistant Professor. I love teaching African fiction and contemporary British novels. Brittle Paper is the virtual space/station where I play and experiment with ideas on how to reinvent African fiction and literary culture.

No comments yet.

Leave a Reply

I hold a doctorate in English from Duke University and recently joined the Marquette University English faculty as an Assistant Professor. I love teaching African fiction and contemporary British novels. Brittle Paper is the virtual space/station where I play and experiment with ideas on how to reinvent African fiction and literary culture.

Monthly Newsletter!

Subscribe for African literature news, and receive a free copy of our
"Guide to African Novels."

Archives

Fiston Mwanza Mujila’s Tram 83 Wins the 2018 Peter Rosegger Literature Prize

fiston mujila mwanza

Fiston Mwanza Mujila has won the 2018 Rosegger Literary Prize in Austria for his debut novel Tram 83. Mujila was shortlisted […]

Psalm 151 | Theresa Lola | Poetry

PSALM151

Theresa Lola is a poet of considerable achievement. A few months ago, she became a joint winner of the 2018 […]

Opportunity for African Writers | Enter for the 2019 Gerald Kraak Award

gerald kraak - as you like it

The 2019 Gerald Kraak Award is open for submissions. The deadline is 25 June 2018. Founded in 2016 by the Jacana […]

If Football Nations Were Rappers | Musa Okwonga’s World Cup Thread Is a Twitter Moment

musa okwonga - god is in the tv zine

Writer-musician Musa Okwonga last week saw a fun thread he started, “If Football Nations Were Rappers,” in which he matched football […]

Cassava Republic Warns Against the Deletion of Local Publishing Houses

cassava republic books

A few days ago, publishers Cassava Republic published on their site a trend in which Nigerian media de-prioritize the work […]

Crime-Writing as Political Engagement in Moroccan Literature

InstaBox_201861813422729

Among the best known Moroccan writers are Laila Lalami, UNESCO-Sharjah Prize winner Bensalem Himmich, Grand Atlas Prize winner Youssef Fadel, Prix Goncourt […]

Thanks for signing up!

Never miss out on new posts. Subscribe to a digest, too:

No thanks, I only want the monthly newsletter.