Poems for Profit

Roaringly funny. On the difficulties of walking the sometimes long and uncertain road from poetry to profit. Enjoy! Hope your weekend is sunny and fun!

There are so many poets with so many books on so many presses swarming so many internet radio sites, readings, conferences, and all that other horseshit—mainly for “exposure”—that we’re all a bit fatigued. But what to do about it? — Read More

A piece by Quincy Lehr for Contemporary Poetry Review.

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I'm finishing up a phd at Duke University where I study African novels, which I believe are some of the loveliest things ever written. Brittle Paper is the virtual space/station where I play and experiment with ideas on how to reinvent African fiction and literary culture.

2 Responses to “Poems for Profit” Subscribe

  1. eunice egonmwan ukwajunor 2012/04/20 at 10:22 am #

    Although am not a literature student I must say I love your work. Your write ups are very impressive. I read almost all your post on brittle paper.

  2. admin 2012/04/20 at 4:54 pm #

    Eunice! Thanks so much for visiting brittle Paper o. Hope you’re doing well.

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