bernard-dadiecc81-lettres-africainesBernard Dadié is 100!

His birthday was on January 10, but last week the literary legend had the chance to celebrate the huge milestone in the best way possible. He joined friends and family in Abidjan were he was honored as the winner of the UNESCO sponsored Jamie Torres Bodet award.

Winning the award comes with a 50, 000 dollar cash prize and recognition for the work he as done promoting literature and culture.

Sometimes referred to as the Achebe of Ivorian literature, Dadié is known for his stellar career as a poet. We have people like Dadié to thank for the existence of an African literary culture and institution. Born in 1916, he was there when it all began. His poems and novels were inspiration for the black nationalist movement called negritude. The poem “Je Vous Remercie Mon Dieu” is considered one of the greatest negritude anthems of all time. Dadié’s life’s work of about 20 books cuts across multiple genres.

It comes as no surprise that Dadié wins this award given in recognition for contributions made “to the development of knowledge and society through art, teaching and research in social sciences and humanities.”

The initial list of candidates were drawn from 20 countries. UNESCO reports that Dadié was unanimously voted as the winner of the prize in acknowledgement of his status as a “pioneer and giant of African literature.” The Jamie Torres Bodet award is in its first year and is set up to run every two years.

Jeune Afrique reports that Dadié received the award himself, in spite of his age. Even though his son went on to give his acceptance speech, Dadié was able to put in a few remarks in which he said, with his voice trembling, that his writing has always been about shining the light of knowledge.

Congrats to Dadié! We feel truly blest to celebrate with a true veteran of African literature.

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Post image by AFP / Sia Kambou Shooting Thankar Chanda Article from RFI via On n’est ps de moutons

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I hold a doctorate in English from Duke University and recently joined the Marquette University English faculty as an Assistant Professor. I love teaching African fiction and contemporary British novels. Brittle Paper is the virtual space/station where I play and experiment with ideas on how to reinvent African fiction and literary culture.

4 Responses to “Bernard Dadié The Achebe of Ivory Coast Wins Literary Prize at 100” Subscribe

  1. henry 2016/03/01 at 09:23 #

    Great father of the pen.

  2. Henry Lynn Herbst 2016/03/13 at 22:30 #

    Je felicite M. Bernard Dadie a l’epoque decernement du prix prestigieux de l’ONU. Je me rappelle de mon sejour a Abidjan en 1988 quand j’ai eu l’honneur de faire la connaissance de M. Dadie et d’entre invite chez lui et a passé une soirée avec lui, sa famille et Mme. Nicole Vicellioni. Je n’oublierai jamais sa gentilesse. C’etait a l’epoque ou j’ai establi une echange d’eleves entre Phillips Academy dans le Massachusetts et le College Jean Mermoz avec l’aide de M. Dadie. Je voudrais aussi feliciter M. Dadie au moment de son centenaire.
    Avec toutes mes felicitations.
    Henry Lynn Herbst

Trackbacks/Pingbacks

  1. Cerrando el 2016 | LitERaFRicAs - 2016/12/31

    […] sorprendía con su cambio de look. Pero el que más nos hacía abrir la boca era Bernard Dadié que a sus 100 años ganaba otro premio literario. El mes vino, de todas formas, cargado de premios y nominaciones. Fiston Mujila se hizo con el […]

  2. Se acaba el año y echamos la vista atrás, con | ONG AFRICANDO SOLIDARIDAD CON AFRICA - 2017/02/18

    […] sorprendía con su cambio de look. Pero el que más nos hacía abrir la boca era Bernard Dadié que a sus 100 años ganaba otro premio literario. El mes vino, de todas formas, cargado de premios y nominaciones. Fiston Mujila se hizo con el […]

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I hold a doctorate in English from Duke University and recently joined the Marquette University English faculty as an Assistant Professor. I love teaching African fiction and contemporary British novels. Brittle Paper is the virtual space/station where I play and experiment with ideas on how to reinvent African fiction and literary culture.

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