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Head of Dior Maria Grazia Chiuri made a bold statement at her catwalk show in the beautiful gardens of the Musée Rodin, Paris.  The models strutted down the runway to Chimamanda Adichie’s Beyonce-sampled TED talk, while rocking a staple white t-shirt with the slogan “we should all be feminists.”

There is Adichie right there on the highly coveted front row. As Vogue.com reports, Adichie occupied the front row alongside the likes of Rihanna, Jennifer Lawrence, and fashion heavyweights.

She looks gorgeous in a sleek up-do and a long-sleeved monochrome dress paired with magenta shoes.

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This bold feminist statement was appropriate as it celebrated the position of Maria Grazia Chiuri as the first woman to head the house of Christian Dior, arguably making her the most powerful woman in Parisian fashion.

Kudos to Chiuri and Adichie! We are all for this kind of collaboration between powerful women. This says a lot about Adichie’s influence as an iconic figure of feminism.

 

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Professional procrastinator, aspiring Jacquette of all trades. Literature and English Language student who likes to label herself as a "creative" without really knowing what the title holds. Studies at the University of Sheffield, UK. Born in Nigeria, age 20. Fashion and lifestyle blogger @queenofsheeba.uk

One Response to “Chimamanda Adichie Had a Christian Dior Moment” Subscribe

  1. Steve Alexandre-Adams 2016/10/26 at 07:20 #

    What is this thing called feminism folks talk about?Adichie does not come across,to me,as serious feminist–she is married to an adorable husband,she is a biological mother and,well,have written books centred around women with men in their lives.Maybe feminisn is all about electing to have ‘Ms’ before your name instead of ‘Mrs’.But again–historially–feminisn is house of confusion,as male chaunism.Lebs think they are just the right feminist,because they have suceeded in some way in obliterating the existence of men altogether.Life is much better if one does not run around with tag.

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I hold a doctorate in English from Duke University and recently joined the Marquette University English faculty as an Assistant Professor. I love teaching African fiction and contemporary British novels. Brittle Paper is the virtual space/station where I play and experiment with ideas on how to reinvent African fiction and literary culture.

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