Subscribe to Newsletter
Monthly Newsletter: Join more than 3,000 African literature enthusiasts!
Subscribe for African literature news, and receive a free copy of our "Guide to African Novels."
Tag Archives: feminism

Chimamanda Adichie Will Moderate Michelle Obama’s Book Event at Southbank Center

chimamanda adichie and michelle obama southbank center (1)

Michelle Obama has an event for her new memoir Becoming at Southbank Centre, London, and Chimamanda Adichie will be having a live chat session with her. The news was announced on Southbank Centre’s event page. As you can imagine, Adichie’s fans are beyond delighted. The event will take place at Southbank Centre’s Royal Festival Hall […]

Read More 1 Comment

Megan Ross’ Milk Fever: An Intimate Meditation on Motherhood and the Female Body | Mapule Mohulatsi

“Nobody will ever get my milk no more except my own children. I never had to give it to nobody else—and the one time I did it was took from me—they held me down and took it. Milk that belonged to my baby . . . . I know what it is to be without […]

Read More 0 Comments

This Essay Collection is a South Africa-Inspired Feminist Anthem for All Women

In the era of #metoo and #timesup, we are, more than ever before, in need of writing that deepens our understanding of feminism and the female experience. Women writers are stepping up to the task, spearheading all kinds of literary projects centered on exploring all the complexities of gender inequality while proposing strategies for resistance […]

Read More 0 Comments

“What Keeps Girls from Knowing the Power in Them?”: Mona Eltahawy on the Importance of Female Rage

Egyptian writer and outspoken feminist Mona Eltahawy is asking important questions about the necessity and possibilities of female anger. In an op-ed titled “What the World Would Look Like if We Taught Girls to Rage,” published on NBCNews, she uses examples—of a stranger who showed her his genitals when she was a child, of Ursula […]

Read More 0 Comments

All the Scoop on Minna Salami’s Debut Book on Black Radical Feminism

The last year has been an empowering but also trying and chaotic time for women. Between the #MeToo phenomenon and the daily controversies over sexual politics, there is no doubt that we could all use some clarity on a whole range of issues. That is why the news of Minna Salami’s debut book couldn’t have […]

Read More 0 Comments

Chimamanda Adichie at City of Columbia’s Books In Bloom Festival | By Arao Ameny

The city of Columbia, Maryland—a city located midway between Washington D.C. and Baltimore—hosted its first literary festival ‘Books in Bloom’ this past Sunday on June 11 at Symphony Woods Park. Nigerian writer and Columbia resident, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, headlined the event this past Sunday promoting her book Dear Ijeawele, or A Feminist Manifesto in Fifteen […]

Read More 1 Comment

Chimamanda Adichie’s New Instagram Account is a Must-Follow

It looks like the Nigerian fashion and literary communities finally have something to celebrate in common. Chimamanda Adichie is now on Instagram. Yes, you heard right. One of Africa’s foremost novelists is now Instagram official! And her account is 100 percent about fashion and style. Adichie made the announcement on May 8 in a Facebook post. […]

Read More 0 Comments

Opportunity for African Writers | Submit to Anthology of African Queer Erotica

  HOLAA is an art and literary project that celebrates queer African women and communities. They’re asking writers everywhere to contribute to an anthology of erotic writing. The anthology is titled Dark Juices & Afrodisiacs – An Erotic Anthology.  Read the official call for submission for more details on how to submit your work: Dark […]

Read More 0 Comments

Welcome to Brittle Paper, your go-to site for African writing and literary culture. We bring you all the latest news and juicy updates on publications, authors, events, prizes, and lifestyle. Follow us on Twitter and Instagram (@brittlepaper) and sign up for our "I love African Literature" newsletter.

Monthly Newsletter!

Subscribe for African literature news, and receive a free copy of our
"Guide to African Novels."

Archives

Demons in the Villa | Excerpt from Ebenezer Obadare’s Pentecostal Republic

pentecostal republics ebenezer obadare

Pentecostal Republic takes a hard look at the influence of pentecostalism in Nigerian politics. Prof. Obadare is a sociologist, who […]

Yasmin Belkhyr, Romeo Oriogun, Liyou Libsekal, JK Anowe Featured in Forthcoming 20.35 Africa Anthology Guest-Edited by Gbenga Adesina and Safia Elhillo

20.35 africa contributors

In February, we announced a call for submissions for a new poetry project. The anthology, 20.35 Africa: An Anthology of Contemporary Poetry, […]

On Black and Arab Identities: Safia Elhillo’s Arab American Book Awards Acceptance Speech

Safia Elhillo - tcb book club (2)

Safia Elhillo has won the 2018 Arab American Book Award, also known as the George Ellenbogen Poetry Award, for her […]

Attend the Second Edition of the Write with Style Workshop with Oris Aigbokhaevbolo

Oris Aigbokhaevbolo (2)

Following the first edition of the Write With Style Workshop, the award-winning writer, critic, and journalist Oris Aigbokhaevbolo is hosting […]

Ngugi’s Novel, Matigari, Is Being Adapted to Film by Nollywood Director Kunle Afolayan

Kenyan author Ngugi wa ThiongÕo, Distinguished Professor of English and comparative literature at UC Irvine, is on the short list for the 2010 Nobel Prize in literature, for xxx(add phrase or blurb here from award announcement; 

Chancellor quote? Christine writing and getting approved quote).

Ngugi, whose name is pronounced ÒGoogyÓ and means Òwork,Ó is a prolific writer of novels, plays, essays and childrenÕs literature. Many of these have skewered the harsh sociopolitical conditions of post-Colonial Kenya, where he was born, imprisoned by the government and forced into exile.

His recent works have been among his most highly acclaimed and include what some consider his finest novel, ÒMurogi wa KagogoÓ (ÒWizard of the CrowÓ), a sweeping 2006 satire about globalization that he wrote in his native Gikuyu language. In his 2009 book ÒSomething Torn & New: An African Renaissance,Ó Ngugi argues that a resurgence of African languages is necessary to the restoration of African wholeness.

ÒI use the novel form to explore issues of wealth, power and values in society and how their production and organization in society impinge on the quality of a peopleÕs spiritual life,Ó he has said.

Ngugi wa Thiong’o’s 1987 novel Matigari is being adapted to film by Nollywood director Kunle Afolayan in a co-production with yet undisclosed Kenyan […]

Safia Elhillo Makes a Fashion Statement at the Arab American Book Awards

Safia Elhillo - tcb book club (2)

From Taiye Selasi’s dreamy designer collections and Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie’s flayed sleeves and Dior collaboration to Alain Mabanckou’s dapper suits […]

Thanks for signing up!

Never miss out on new posts. Subscribe to a digest, too:

No thanks, I only want the monthly newsletter.