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Dear Teju Cole fans hoping that his next book would be fiction, you’ll have to wait a little while longer. The author announced on Facebook that he has a new book coming out, and it is not fiction. Well, it’s the next best thing. A picture book!

The book is titled Blind Spot and set for a June 2017 release through Random House.

Blind Spot is being called a “multi-media diary.” In the book, Cole displays a series of original full color photographs alongside “lyrical and evocative” accounts of his many travels all over the world. It sounds like a coffee table photography book that includes pieces of Cole’s writings.

The 30 dollar price tag sounds like a bank breaker. Then again, you’re getting 150 photographs paired with gorgeously written vignettes.

Anyway, congrats to Cole! We can’t help but draw inspiration from the fact that he is always hard at work creating beautiful things worth celebrating.

Here is an excerpt of the Amazon blurb to give you a richer sense of the project.

When it comes to Teju Cole, the unexpected is not unfamiliar: He’s an acclaimed novelist, an influential essayist, and an internationally exhibited photographer. In Blind Spot, readers follow Cole’s inimitable artistic vision into the visual realm as he continues to refine the voice, eye, and intellectual obsessions that earned him such acclaim for Open City.
 
Here, journey through more than 150 of Cole’s full-color, original photos, each accompanied by his lyrical and evocative prose, forming a multimedia diary of years of near-constant travel: from a park in Berlin to a mountain range in Switzerland, a church exterior in Lagos to a parking lot in Brooklyn; landscapes, beautiful or quotidian, that inspire Cole’s memories, fantasies, and introspections. Ships in Capri remind him of the work of writers from Homer to Edna O’Brien; a hotel room in Wannsee brings back a disturbing dream about a friend’s death; a home in Tivoli evokes a transformative period of semi-

Pre-order HERE

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I hold a doctorate in English from Duke University and recently joined the Marquette University English faculty as an Assistant Professor. I love teaching African fiction and contemporary British novels. Brittle Paper is the virtual space/station where I play and experiment with ideas on how to reinvent African fiction and literary culture.

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I hold a doctorate in English from Duke University and recently joined the Marquette University English faculty as an Assistant Professor. I love teaching African fiction and contemporary British novels. Brittle Paper is the virtual space/station where I play and experiment with ideas on how to reinvent African fiction and literary culture.

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