The judges: Kgauhelo Dube, Bwesigye Bwa Mwesigire, and Sabata-mpho Mokae.

Black Letter Media has released the three-person list of judges for the 2017 edition of its short story competition. The judges are Kgauhelo Dube, Bwesigye Bwa Mwesigire, and Sabata-mpho Mokae.

The entries for the contest will be assessed blindly by the judges. The first, second, and third place winners will receive R5,000, R1,500 and R500 respectively.

Kgauhelo Dube, founder of Kajen Media, is an accomplished figure in the arts sector which she forayed into after quitting her career in the advertising/communications agency. She promotes African literature through a number of multimedia platforms.

Altruistic in her attempts to put African literature on the map, Dube has also been recognised for her efforts. She was a nominee in the Department of Arts And Culture’s 2015 Mbokodo Women In Arts Award for the category of “Promoting Arts, Culture and Heritage in the Media”.

Unarguably one of the most influential figures in contemporary African writing, Bwesigye Bwa Mwesigire is the co-founder of the Centre for African Cultural Excellence (CACE).

He is a lawyer and a writer. His work has appeared in This is Africa, Africa in Words, African Arguments, Africa is a Country, Chimurenga Chronic, Saraba Magazine, African Roar among other literary periodicals.

Sabata-mpho Mokae is a prolific writer who writes in English and Setswana. He teaches creative writing at Sol Plaatje University in Kimberly. In 2014, he was chosen as writer-in-residence at the Univeristy of Iowa.

His works include a biography, The Story of Sol T Plaatje, a youth novella, Dikeledi, and a poetry collection, Escaping Trauma. His first novel, Ga Ke Modisa (I’m Not My Brother’s Keeper), won the M-Net Literary Award for Best Novel in Setswana as well as the M-Net Film Award in 2013.

The contest closes on the 31st of May, 2017.

You just might be the lucky winner of the R5000 cash prize.

Click here to learn more about the competition.

Tags: , , ,

About kanyinsola olorunnisola

View all posts by kanyinsola olorunnisola

No comments yet.

Leave a Reply

I hold a doctorate in English from Duke University and recently joined the Marquette University English faculty as an Assistant Professor. I love teaching African fiction and contemporary British novels. Brittle Paper is the virtual space/station where I play and experiment with ideas on how to reinvent African fiction and literary culture.

Subscribe to Blog via Email

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Archives

I Hear a Few More Things When Bob Dylan Says ‘a Hard Rain’s a-gonna Fall’ | Chisom Okafor | Poetry

33130808452_c617d33eb3_o

My father plays a song aloud on Sundays, that begins with ‘Where’ve you been my blue-eyed girl?’ We scream on […]

The 2017 Babishai Haiku Prize Goes to Kenya’s Kariuki wa Nyamu

BABISHAI 2017 FLYER PURPLE

The 2017 Babishai Haiku Award has gone to Kenya’s Kariuki wa Nyamu for his three haikus: “last night’s rain,” “in the […]

Dreams, Remember Yesterday | Elizabeth Semende | Poetry

33431786922_b8bf038321_o

Dreams: This hole is a grave where dreams toss and turn, Touch the wind and sway with it. See the […]

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie’s New Short Story Is All Love, Class and Multiculturalism

adichie facebook

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie’s new short story in Harper’s Bazaar, a brief one titled “How Did You Feel About It?,” is all […]

Translating Guinea-Bissau’s First English-Language Novel | by Jethro Soutar

33528763244_efa32f75a1_o

In June, we brought news of the publication of the first ever novel from Guinea-Bissau to be translated into Englis.  […]

Akwaeke Emezi’s Guide to Becoming a Successful Writer in 35 Tweets

akwaekeemezi copy

Last week, Akwaeke Emezi put on her life coach cape and dished out truths that every writer, artist, dreamer, and […]