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Dear Brittlepaperian!

You are the best reader a blogger could ever hope for. It’s been a pleasure exploring the vast and breathtakingly beautiful universe of African literature with you.

This is the last post for the year until January 4. I thought I’d use it to make a brief statement thanking you for making Brittle Paper the #1 destination for fans of African literature.

In 2010, I established Brittle Paper to explore my interest in literature and philosophy. It became an African literary blog when I discovered that many people read African writing for the wrong reasons. It is common to find people who think of African literature as this square, overtly ideological body of writing that is read to be enlightened about Africa and its political plight. To these readers, African literature is neither fun, enjoyable, sexy, nor innovative. They read African literature because of what they imagine it teaches them about African life. Brittle Paper was this magical space where I hoped readers would fall head over heels in love with African writing and literary culture. I want to thank for helping me realize this vision in 2015.

This year has been a success. Brittle Paper has grown exponentially, recording tens of thousands of monthly page views. All this could not have been possible without a reader such as yourself. Thank you for visiting brittlepaper.com. Thank you for reading and sharing your favorite posts on social media. Thank you for recommending the site to friends and family. Most of all, thank you for being a demanding reader and challenging me to do better.

I want to thank every writer I published this year—well over a hundred of you. Thanks for sharing your work with Brittle Paper readers and trusting that they will treat your work with the love and attention it deserves. I’d like to single out the two authors of the story series—Eugene Odogwu (In the Shadow of Iyanibi and Obinna Udenwe (Holy Sex). Both series were well received. The Holy Sex series was even featured on the Guardian. I want to celebrate both writers for their brilliance and their openness to the unconventional.

Thanks to Nmadiuto Uche for coming on board as a Brittle Paper writer. She writes beautifully. Also a big thank you to Sylvia Ofili who earlier in the year came through for me at the most difficult times.

Many of you have expressed interest to blog for Brittle Paper. Be patient with me. In 2016, I plan on bringing more bloggers on board.

Speaking of 2016, I can’t wait to roll out all the plans I have in place to make Brittle Paper so much more fun.

Wishing you all a very happy holiday!

Ainehi Edoro is an Assistant Professor of English at the University of Wisconsin-Madison where she teaches African literature. She received her doctorate at Duke University. She is the founder and editor of Brittle Paper and series editor of Ohio University Press’s Modern African Writer’s imprint.

8 Responses to “Thank You for Being an Amazing Fan of African Literature” Subscribe

  1. Jibola December 15, 2015 at 12:23 pm #

    All thanks go to you for creating this delightful haven, Ainehi. Thanks to Sylvia, Nmadiuto and your talented contributors. I can’t wait to see what 2016 holds for Brittle Paper. Here’s to greater things.

    By the way, is there any chance of us reading a “2015 Books of the Year” post? You could ask some of your contributors to share their favourite reads. It’ll be fun. Ciao.

  2. Nmadiuto Uche December 15, 2015 at 2:10 pm #

    Aww Thanks Ainehi for the mention. Brittle Paper gives us refreshing literary content and you are the best writing boss:)

    It will be nice to do a Books of the Year list as Jibola said though. Maybe a Twitter vote then a follow up in January?

  3. Larry Gabriel December 15, 2015 at 9:26 pm #

    Thank you for this site. I have been a fan of African literature since 1966 after reading Things Fall Apart. Your blog is indispensable in enabling me to keep up with the new novels published. Thank you again.

  4. Yugo Gabriel' December 16, 2015 at 5:24 am #

    Thank you too for a site like this. I wonder what time you have for yourself with the ever increasing submissions requesting attention. Readership of African literature is growing, just as its writer-ship. Thanks to such forward thinking and painstaking efforts of bloggers like you. Not forgetting to mention the contributors. Many thanks!

  5. Hakeem Adam December 16, 2015 at 8:20 am #

    Thank you again for giving me a platform to share my writing and also allowing me to discover many other great writers. God bless you.

  6. Sara December 16, 2015 at 10:23 am #

    Thank you for making this available; you’ve truly filled a gap. I am excited to see what you do in 2016.

  7. farida December 17, 2015 at 3:24 am #

    See you in 2016!

  8. Bolaji December 18, 2015 at 10:10 am #

    For me, I adore Brittle Paper for giving African writers voice and and propagating literary appreciation of African creativity.
    Through this avenue reading culture believe will be revived.
    Thanks to Ainehi, for making us salivate for African literary works and personally a big thanks to you for encouraging me to write quality poems, all encomiums for you till 2016!

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Welcome to Brittle Paper, your go-to site for African writing and literary culture. We bring you all the latest news and juicy updates on publications, authors, events, prizes, and lifestyle. Follow us on Twitter and Instagram (@brittlepaper) and sign up for our "I love African Literature" newsletter.

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