Subscribe to Newsletter
Monthly Newsletter: Join more than 3,000 African literature enthusiasts!
Subscribe for African literature news, and receive a free copy of our "Guide to African Novels."

There is a saying that most of us have our doppelgangers, those other people whose faces puzzlingly, frighteningly, humourously look just like ours. In the past months, attention has been drawn to non-famous people who resemble such celebrities as Lionel Messi and Kim Kardashian. But even famous people can resemble each other, like Natalie Portman and Keira Knightley.

Today, we’re highlighting two Caine Prize winning and nominated writers who look just like two famous actresses, who together represent four countries: Zambia, Ethiopia, Nigeria, Uganda.

Sample 1: Namwali Serpell and Ruth Negga

Oscar-nominated Ethiopian-Irish actress Ruth Negga (left) and Caine Prize-winning Zambian writer Namwali Serpell (right) look alike.

We know Namwali Serpell, who is Zambian. We’ve known her for the past eight years, from the first time she appeared on the Caine Prize shortlist in 2010 to her second time when she won in 2015. We know she’s not only one of our most accomplished prose stylists but also an ambitious essayist. And we do know Ruth Negga, who is Ethiopian-Irish. We know her from those cool-headed performances in World War Z and Loving, the last of which got her a Best Actress Oscar nomination this year. But we also know Negga from books. We did a feature on her reading from Zadie Smith’s novel Swing Time.

And now we know they look alike: cherubic eyes, lovely cheekbones, enthralling facial beauty. What are the odds of a brilliant Zambian writer and a brilliant Ethiopian actress resembling each other?

Namwali Serpell (left), Ruth Negga (right).

We get the feeling that without captions most people would struggle to identify each woman.

Ruth Negga (left), Namwali Serpell (right).

Sample 2: Arinze Ifeakandu and Madina Nalwanga

Caine Prize-shortlisted Nigerian writer Arinze Ifeakandu (left) and Ugandan actress Nalwanga Madina, star of Queen of Katwe (right).

This one, the strangest of them all, is a case we’ve known since mid-2016 when the trailer for Queen of Katwe was released.

Nigeria’s Arinze Ifeakandu—2013 Farafina Workshop alumni, 2015 A Public Space Emerging Writer Fellow, 2015 BN Poetry Award finalist, 2017 Caine Prize shortlistee—is, at 22, one of the torchbearers for the New Generation of writers. We know him too well, from his memoir, his nonfiction, and every other time we’ve featured his work.

Uganda’s Madina Nalwanga, star of Queen of Katwe in which she plays the chess prodigy Phiona Mutesi alongside Lupita Nyong’o and David Oyelowo, is only 17 and one of the most talented child actors on the continent.

Both look set for big careers.

Arinze Ifeakandu (left), Nalwanga Madina (right).

Were it not that Arinze is male and has hairs on his jaw and Madina is female and wears lipstick and earrings and a darker, shiny skin, we might have a real struggle in telling them apart: same low cut hair, same eyebrow curve, same nose, same childlike innocence—how did this happen?

Arinze Ifeakandu (left), Nalwanga Madina (right).

Research Finding

The Caine Prize has a knack for honouring writers who look like actresses. But the writers must come from countries far away from that of their lookalike.

This means that the 2018 Caine Prize will be won by a Ghanaian or Congolese who looks like Lupita Nyong’o. Or a Sudanese or South African who looks like Idris Elba.

Tags: , , , ,

About Otosirieze Obi-Young

View all posts by Otosirieze Obi-Young
Otosirieze Obi-Young was born in Aba, Nigeria and attended the University of Nigeria, Nsukka. A finalist for the 2016 Miles Morland Writing Scholarship, his short stories include: “A Tenderer Blessing,” which appears in Transition Magazine and was nominated for a Pushcart Prize in 2015; “Mulumba,” which appears in The Threepenny Review; and “You Sing of a Longing,” which was shortlisted for the inaugural Gerald Kraak Award and appears in Pride and Prejudice, an anthology by The Jacana Literary Foundation and The Other Foundation. His essays appear in Interdisciplinary Academic Essays and in Brittle Paper where he is Deputy Editor. His interviews appear in Africa in Dialogue, Bakwa Magazine, SPRINNG, and Dwartonline. He is the editor of the Art Naija Series, a sequence of themed e-anthologies of writing and visual art exploring different aspects of Nigerianness. The first, Enter Naija: The Book of Places (October 2016), focuses on Nigerian cities. The second, Work Naija: The Book of Vocations (June 2017), focuses on professions in Nigeria. A postgraduate student of African Studies, he currently teaches English at Godfrey Okoye University, Enugu, Nigeria. When bored, he blogs pop culture at naijakulture.blogspot.com or just Googles Rihanna.

No comments yet.

Leave a Reply

I hold a doctorate in English from Duke University and recently joined the Marquette University English faculty as an Assistant Professor. I love teaching African fiction and contemporary British novels. Brittle Paper is the virtual space/station where I play and experiment with ideas on how to reinvent African fiction and literary culture.

Monthly Newsletter!

Subscribe for African literature news, and receive a free copy of our
"Guide to African Novels."

Archives

Watch This Poetry Dance Film of Kayo Chingonyi’s “Kumukanda”

kayo chingonyi - the guardian

Zambian poet Kayo Chingonyi’s first full-length collection, Kumukanda, is receiving praise. The Guardian has hailed its “lyrical elegance” and “many […]

Photos | Nommo Awards 2017: How Africa’s First Ever Speculative Fiction Awards Ceremony Happened

IMG_7063

The announcement of the winners of the inaugural Nommo Awards took place at the ongoing 2017 Ake Arts and Book […]

Goodreads Awards 2017: Vote Chimamanda Adichie’s “Dear Ijeawele” and Nnedi Okorafor’s “Home” in the Final Round

Nnedi-Okorafor BELLA NAIJA

Earlier this month we announced the online voting for Goodreads’ 2017 awards. The first round saw nominations for four authors having massively […]

#AkeFest2017 | Follow Brittle Paper’s Coverage of Ake Arts and Book Festival

ake festival (1)

  Ake Arts and Book Festival is happening in Abeokuta, Nigeria—has been happening since 14 November, to end on 18 […]

Opportunity for Writers and Visual Artists | Apply for the 2017 Artists in Residency Programme

Applications are open for the 2017 Artists in Residency (AIR) programme, an initiative of Africa Centre “seeking high calibre African artists, in […]

South African Literary Awards 2017: All the Winners

The winners of the 2017 South African Literary Awards have been announced. Here they are, with excerpts from their citations. […]

Thanks for signing up!

Never miss out on new posts. Subscribe to a digest, too:

No thanks, I only want the monthly newsletter.