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Now we know that when Chimamanda Adichie is not writing bestsellers or championing feminism in haute couture circles, she is hanging out with celebrities at one of Hollywood’s most exclusive parties.

On Sunday, March 4, Adichie was at the Vanity Fair Oscars after-party celebrating the glitz and glamour of Hollywood alongside the likes of Drake, Lupita Nyongo, and Margot Robbie.

She shared photos of herself at the event with the Instagram caption:

I loved my Dior dress by Maria Grazia Chiuri. It felt almost transcendent. Heavy fabric swirling with color, muted and vibrant, commanding its own space. A gorgeousness so compelling I was happy to yili efe na-egosi ala m 😝

Some of you have really bad eyesight and, as such, may have totally missed one of the most glaring attributes of the dress: the decolletage. Adichie is clearly addressing you when she writes: “yili efe na-egosi ala m” or “wearing a dress that shows my breasts.”

By the way, in keeping with her #ProjectWearNigeria initiative, Adichie accessorized the Dior dress with Nigerian brands.

FYI: In a little over a month, Adichie will be interviewing Hilary Clinton in a live-chat session following Clinton’s delivery of PEN America’s Arthur Miller Freedom to Write lecture. Find out more HERE.

 

*******

Images via: Instagram | @chimamanda_adichie

Dress | @Dior

Earrings | @fffinejewellery

Bag | @zashadu

 

I hold a doctorate in English from Duke University and recently joined the Marquette University English faculty as an Assistant Professor. I love teaching African fiction and contemporary British novels. Brittle Paper is the virtual space/station where I play and experiment with ideas on how to reinvent African fiction and literary culture.

One Response to “Chimamanda Adichie at the Vanity Fair Oscars After-Party” Subscribe

  1. Lynnda March 8, 2018 at 10:17 am #

    The words ‘yili efe na-egosi ala m’ in this context actually means she is wearing a clothe that describes/shows her land/culture. It doesn’t mean “wearing a dress that shows my breasts,” – which is word for word translation.

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