Subscribe to Newsletter
Monthly Newsletter: Join more than 3,000 African literature enthusiasts!
Subscribe for African literature news, and receive a free copy of our "Guide to African Novels."

Now we know that when Chimamanda Adichie is not writing bestsellers or championing feminism in haute couture circles, she is hanging out with celebrities at one of Hollywood’s most exclusive parties.

On Sunday, March 4, Adichie was at the Vanity Fair Oscars after-party celebrating the glitz and glamour of Hollywood alongside the likes of Drake, Lupita Nyongo, and Margot Robbie.

She shared photos of herself at the event with the Instagram caption:

I loved my Dior dress by Maria Grazia Chiuri. It felt almost transcendent. Heavy fabric swirling with color, muted and vibrant, commanding its own space. A gorgeousness so compelling I was happy to yili efe na-egosi ala m 😝

Some of you have really bad eyesight and, as such, may have totally missed one of the most glaring attributes of the dress: the decolletage. Adichie is clearly addressing you when she writes: “yili efe na-egosi ala m” or “wearing a dress that shows my breasts.”

By the way, in keeping with her #ProjectWearNigeria initiative, Adichie accessorized the Dior dress with Nigerian brands.

FYI: In a little over a month, Adichie will be interviewing Hilary Clinton in a live-chat session following Clinton’s delivery of PEN America’s Arthur Miller Freedom to Write lecture. Find out more HERE.

 

*******

Images via: Instagram | @chimamanda_adichie

Dress | @Dior

Earrings | @fffinejewellery

Bag | @zashadu

 

I hold a doctorate in English from Duke University and recently joined the Marquette University English faculty as an Assistant Professor. I love teaching African fiction and contemporary British novels. Brittle Paper is the virtual space/station where I play and experiment with ideas on how to reinvent African fiction and literary culture.

One Response to “Chimamanda Adichie at the Vanity Fair Oscars After-Party” Subscribe

  1. Lynnda 2018/03/08 at 10:17 #

    The words ‘yili efe na-egosi ala m’ in this context actually means she is wearing a clothe that describes/shows her land/culture. It doesn’t mean “wearing a dress that shows my breasts,” – which is word for word translation.

Leave a Reply

I hold a doctorate in English from Duke University and recently joined the Marquette University English faculty as an Assistant Professor. I love teaching African fiction and contemporary British novels. Brittle Paper is the virtual space/station where I play and experiment with ideas on how to reinvent African fiction and literary culture.

Monthly Newsletter!

Subscribe for African literature news, and receive a free copy of our
"Guide to African Novels."

Archives

She Cannot Write a ​Boring Sentence: Novuyo Rosa Tshuma’s House of Stone Praised by Helon Habila

house of stone novuyo rosa tshuma

Novuyo Rosa Tshuma’s novel House of Stone, an exploration of family history, colonial Rhodesia, and the birth of modern Zimbabwe, […]

Sisonke Msimang Profiled in The Wall Street Journal

sisonke msimang - wsj

South African writer and activist Sisonke Msimang, author of the memoir Always Another Country and the forthcoming collection of essays […]

Reneilwe Malatji’s Short Story Collection, Love Interrupted, is an Intimate Portrait of Womanhood in South Africa

Reneilwe Malatji's Love Interrupted

Reneilwe Malatji’s debut short story collection, Love Interrupted, was published on August 7 in the U.S., by Catalyst Press. Its […]

In Conversation with Hadiza El-Rufai, Author of An Abundance of Scorpions | Deaduramilade Tawak

an abundance of scorpions - syncity

Hadiza El-Rufai, founder of the Yasmin El-Rufai Foundation, debuted a novel this year, An Abundance of Scorpions, for which she recently […]

I Started Reading and Just Stopped Halfway and Thought—This is Really Bad | What Achebe, Soyinka, Adichie, Forna, Teju Cole and Serpell Thought About VS Naipaul

vs naipaul - irish examiner

VS Naipaul, Nobel Prize and Booker Prize-winning novelist and nonfiction writer, passed on days ago at 85 years of age. […]

This Mournable Body, the Last Book in Tsitsi Dangarembga’s Tambudzai Trilogy, is Here

this mournable body - tsitsi dangrembga

This Mournable Body, the last book in Tsitsi Dangarembga’s trilogy which includes the modern classic Nervous Conditions (1988) and The Book of […]

Thanks for signing up!

Never miss out on new posts. Subscribe to a digest, too:

No thanks, I only want the monthly newsletter.