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Sisca Julius. Photo from K & L Prize.

The inaugural K & L Prize, awarded for unpublished short fiction inspired by historical events in Africa, has gone to South Africa’s Sisca Julius for her story “Honey Bee.” The $1,000 prize, which considers short stories between 1,000 and 2,000 words by writers between 18 and 25 years of age, was founded last year by the New Zealand-based Nigerian novelist Myles Idoko, author of Black River: An Account of Christmas Preacher (2018).

Julius is 23 and studying Afrikaans, Creative Writing, Anthropology and Heritage Studies at Sol Plaatje University, South Africa. She writes in Afrikaans and English. “I love writing in the dialect of the coloured people of South Africa, who mix Afrikaans, English and Khoi languages,” said Julius, who described her winning entry as “a narrative about the way her people of South Africa were stripped of their language.” She “think[s] in Afrikaans,” but “inasmuch as I love Afrikaans, I long to cloak my mouth in clicks like my grandmother and her mother. I am afraid that the Nama language will become extinct in South Africa, and if you lose your language, you lose your culture.”

The prize was judged by the writers Zana Bell and Uchechukwu Umezurike, who also revealed the other three shortlisted stories:

  • “The Many-Faced God” by Melody Anthony
  • “The Secrets of Water Bodies” by Mazpa Ejikem
  • “When Sullen Faces Gnaw at You” by Okechi Okeke

“The stories that made it to the finals are quite impressive,” Umezurike said. “These stories, the four of them, are so different—each poignantly told with its own strengths,” Bell added.

The longlisted short stories will be published in the prize anthology, Histories of Yesterday.

Brittle Paper congratulates the winner and the finalists. 

All inquiries about the K & L Prize should be forwarded to id.ojabo@gmail.com.

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About Otosirieze Obi-Young

View all posts by Otosirieze Obi-Young
Otosirieze Obi-Young is a writer, journalist, & Deputy Editor of Brittle Paper. The recipient of the inaugural The Future Awards Prize for Literature in 2019, he is a judge for The Gerald Kraak Prize and was a judge for The Morland Writing Scholarship in 2019. He is Nonfiction Editor at 14, Nigeria’s first queer art collective, which has published volumes including We Are Flowers (2017) and The Inward Gaze (2018). He is Curator at The Art Naija Series, a sequence of e-anthologies of writing and visual art focusing on different aspects of Nigerianness, including Enter Naija: The Book of Places (2016), which explores cities, and Work Naija: The Book of Vocations (2017), which explores professions. His work in queer equality advocacy in literature has been profiled in Literary Hub. His fiction has appeared in The Threepenny Review and Transition. He has completed a collection of short stories, You Sing of a Longing, is working on a novel, and is represented by David Godwin Associates literary agency. He has an M.A. in African Studies and a combined honours B.A. in History & International Studies/English & Literary Studies, both from the University of Nigeria, Nsukka. He taught English in a private Nigerian university. Find him at otosirieze.com, where he accepts writing and editing offers, or on Instagram or Twitter: @otosirieze. When bored, he Googles Rihanna.

Trackbacks/Pingbacks

  1. EDITORIAL: Africa is a state of mind – BKO Magazine - May 13, 2020

    […] new poetry from young guns such as Angie Chuma, (@angiechuma) and the award-winning SPU sensation, Sisca Julius. We also have old classics such as Moemise Motsepe (@MoemiseMotsepe) and Athol Williams […]

  2. Editorial - Issue #1: Africa is a state of mind - BKO Magazine - May 14, 2020

    […] new poetry from young guns such as Angie Chuma, (@angiechuma) and the award-winning SPU sensation, Sisca Julius. We also have old classics such as Moemise Motsepe (@MoemiseMotsepe) and Athol Williams […]

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