Subscribe to Newsletter
Monthly Newsletter: Join more than 3,000 African literature enthusiasts!
Subscribe for African literature news, and receive a free copy of our "Guide to African Novels."

A Strange New Fiction: Ben Okri and His Stokus

My bookshelves have long since given up. They’ve taken to spitting out books on the carpet at the slightest ache from overload. And Starbook (2007) is one of such books. It is the fourth book from the bottom in a stack sitting on the bare floor, gathering dust.

Ben Okri said in a Youtube video that reading Starbook is like jumping from one cloud to another. He claims that the book is written in a poetic style colored by “mesmerism, hallucination, and dream.” A style that seeks to escape “space, time, and tradition.” Maybe that’s why I fall asleep anytime I try reading Starbook. Maybe you really can only read the book in your dreams.

Half-way through Songs of Enchantment (1993) , the sequel to the Famished Road (1991), I gave up trying to will myself to finish the book. In my frustration, I wanted to hold Okri by the collar and shake him and tell him how silly his books have become. It’s all well and good to soar from cloud to cloud but sometimes, can I please just alight on solid ground, take it all in, before I continue on to the next cloud?

For the record, I am not Achebe. I am not a militant of realism. Famished Road is indeed a charming book. It’ just that Okri for so long has been lost in a strange poetics and needs to find his way back, which he seems to have done in Tales of Freedom (2009), his most recent book, made up of a collections of stories, some of which he has named stokus.

A Strange New Form: What is a Stoku?

The following tales are properly ‘stokus.’ A stoku is an amalgam of short story and haiku. It is story as it inclines toward a flash of a moment, insight, vision or paradox.

It’s origin is mysterious, its purpose is revelation, its form compact, its subject infinite. Its nature is enigma as it finds tentative form in fiction, like the figure materializing from a cloud, or a being emerging from a vaporous block of marble.

By means of the stoku, that which was unknown reveals, in the medium of words, a translated existence. Thus worlds unknown can come into being in a lightning flash from the darkness of the mind. Stokus are serendipities, caught in the air, reverse lightning.

I offer them humbly  as tales found on the shore, in enchanted dawns.

I have read some of them. Plot is whittled down to a series of events that take place in a short period of time. Stokus seem less about story than about a character’s confrontation with a puzzling situation.

“Belonging” is my favorite. A man, in search of an Aunt, has entered the wrong house. The owner of the house mistakes him for his brother-in-law. Caught in one of those awkward situations where it’s easier to play along than to admit misrecognition, the stranger basks in his new identity. In no time, the real in-law arrives. The stranger is disgraced and thrown out even as he finds that the Aunt’s house he was in search of is a madhouse. The end. There is no story here. Only a moment of mistaken identity. But what remains with the reader is the character’s private struggle, which Okri teases out with artistic care and craft.

On a more practical note, fhe stoku just might be the genre of the future. In a 3-G world where we’ve gradually grown to hate lengthy and laborious readings, stoku might be the answer.

Tags: , , , , ,

I hold a doctorate in English from Duke University and recently joined the Marquette University English faculty as an Assistant Professor. I love teaching African fiction and contemporary British novels. Brittle Paper is the virtual space/station where I play and experiment with ideas on how to reinvent African fiction and literary culture.

4 Responses to “A Strange New Fiction: Ben Okri and His Stokus” Subscribe

  1. Creativewritingnews 2011/02/08 at 16:28 #

    What a huge relief to meet someone who feels the same way about Starbook. I struggled through each page and ensured that i read the whole book.

    it was at the time i had just returned from the prestigious Farafina Creative Writing workshop (organized by Chimamanda). We had been encouraged to read ‘writers’ books’ voraciously. I guessed laborious, unintelligible literature were what characterized ‘writers’ books.

    However, i think Starbook is a book for writers. It’s more technical; meant to school and not meant to be enjoyed, so to speak. But that’s just my opinion.

  2. Eshuneutics 2011/02/08 at 23:04 #

    Oh, definitely not a book without pleasure. And certainly not a book for writers, whatever that genre is. It’s a fable, bery simple, that stretches to the fabulous and Okri’s unfailing belief in the Truth-Beauty of literature.

  3. Bookaholicblog 2011/02/09 at 01:47 #

    Ben Okri oh Ben Okri. I have Starbook, not had the courage to stay stuck to it…sure he will take me to strange places.

    I enjoyed Famished Road…made me see Azaro, the abiku boy, hehehe, and kinda believe there is really another unseen world that affects everything in the seen.

    Whatever his meanderings, he writes well…and the road became a river…and the river grew thirsty and wanted blood…maybe the readers want something else, want to be taken somewhere else!

  4. Ainehi 2011/02/09 at 05:02 #

    @ Bookaholic,

    “and the road became a river…and the river grew thirsty and wanted blood.” After Anna Karenina, Famished Road has my favorite opening sentences ever!

    @ Creative writing news: “I guessed laborious, unintelligible literature were what characterized ‘writers’ books.” Lol. Am with you on that. Starbook was a little much for me. But like I said, Tales of Freedom–especially the second half of the book–is beautiful. Love love loved the “stokus.”

    @ Eshuneutics: Curious to know what you think of Starbook. Did you read it? What’s it really about? Is there even a story?

Leave a Reply

I hold a doctorate in English from Duke University and recently joined the Marquette University English faculty as an Assistant Professor. I love teaching African fiction and contemporary British novels. Brittle Paper is the virtual space/station where I play and experiment with ideas on how to reinvent African fiction and literary culture.

Monthly Newsletter!

Subscribe for African literature news, and receive a free copy of our
"Guide to African Novels."

Archives

Cameroonian Novelist Patrick Nganang Details His Experience at Kondengui Central Prison

patrick nganang (1)

A few weeks ago, we reported that Cameroonian novelist Patrick Nganang was remanded in prison, following an article he wrote […]

Zahrah Nesbit-Ahmed Charts an Epic Adventure into African Books

Zahrah Nesbit-Ahmed

Zahrah Nesbit-Ahmed truly has a heart spellbound by books. The brilliant curator of Bookshy blog recently shared the road map […]

Angels and Muse | Artsy Co-working Space Opens in Lagos

Ehikhamenor angels and muse (1)

Award-winning artist and writer Victor Ehikhamenor has always given us the gift of beautiful art. But his latest project, Angels […]

WATCH | Nnedi Okorafor in HBO’s Afro-Futurism Documentary

nnedi okorafor afrofuturism black panther

For the past few months, fans have been connecting the dots between Afro-futurism and the Black Panther superhero movie. So […]

Adichie’s New Nigerian Publisher, Narrative Landscape Press, Is Releasing Box Sets of Wax-Print Cover Designs of Her Books

The Thing Around Your Neck

Dear Nigeria-based Adichie fans, this news is for you! Your favorite Adichie books are being reissued in iconic Ankara (wax-print) […]

“What Keeps Girls from Knowing the Power in Them?”: Mona Eltahawy on the Importance of Female Rage

Mona ELTAHAWY

Egyptian writer and outspoken feminist Mona Eltahawy is asking important questions about the necessity and possibilities of female anger. In […]

Thanks for signing up!

Never miss out on new posts. Subscribe to a digest, too:

No thanks, I only want the monthly newsletter.