Subscribe to Newsletter
Monthly Newsletter: Join more than 3,000 African literature enthusiasts!
Subscribe for African literature news, and receive a free copy of our "Guide to African Novels."

“Things Fall Apart is Now More Famous Than I am!” — Achebe In Recent Interview With Iranian Journalist

Y ou can now read Achebe’s Things Fall Apart in Persian. Achebe wrote the novel in the late 1950s to counteract the notion that Africa’s past was “one long night of savagery.” The novel has become a modern classic and has been translated into more than 50 languages. Perhaps, as an effort to endorse this new translation by Ali Hodavand and also to promote his new book, There Was a Country–A Personal History of Biafra, Achebe did an interview with Nasrin Pourhamrang, Iranian journalist and calligrapher who is also the chief editor of Hatef weekly magazine. Drawing him out with excellent questions, Pourhamrang got Achebe to speak about a whole range of things, including his stint as a children’s book writer, the difficulties of nurturing an African readership in the early days of the African novel, and his work at Brown University. He even went into some of the bitter controversies of the 60s about writing African novels in European languages. Congrats to Achebe for the new translation and the new book! Read interview HERE!

Favorite Quote:

I decided to write for children as a matter of urgency and necessity. I first noticed there was a problem when I had my first child Chinelo and went to the bookshopsto buy books for her. This was soon after independence from Great Britain. The books about Africa for children were, to put it mildly, not appropriate. So I decided that if I did not like the content of the children’s books, I would write my own. — Chinua Achebe (Read the full interview HERE)

Tags: , , , , ,

I hold a doctorate in English from Duke University and recently joined the Marquette University English faculty as an Assistant Professor. I love teaching African fiction and contemporary British novels. Brittle Paper is the virtual space/station where I play and experiment with ideas on how to reinvent African fiction and literary culture.

No comments yet.

Leave a Reply

Welcome to Brittle Paper, your go-to site for African writing and literary culture. We bring you all the latest news and juicy updates on publications, authors, events, prizes, and lifestyle. Follow us on Twitter and Instagram (@brittlepaper) and sign up for our "I love African Literature" newsletter.

Monthly Newsletter!

Subscribe for African literature news, and receive a free copy of our
"Guide to African Novels."

Archives

Sarah Waiswa’s Twitter Thread on African Women Photographers Is a Visual Fest

sarah waiswa thread

Recently on Twitter, the Ugandan-born Kenya-based photographer Sarah Waiswa gave us a curation of stunning photos by African female photographers. […]

Genesis | Kharys Laue | Poetry

Mountain 1200 x 630

  I The beginning contains a seed of the end. II A man stands at the foot of the mountain. […]

GoFundMe | Donate to Help Egyptian Writer and Feminist Icon Nawal El Saadawi Undergo Medical Care

nawal el saadawi - moroccan ladies - graph

The Egyptian writer and feminist icon Nawal El Sadaawi is ill. To foot her medical bills, a GoFundMe appeal was […]

The Home Manual | Ayodeji Oluwaseyi Isaac | Fiction

Lagos 1200 x 630

  You will be coming to my house for the first time, pal, and the following are words to live […]

Every Poem Needs Time to Breathe and Become | Interview with Echezonachukwu Nduka

Echezonachukwu Nduka (6)

  Echezonachukwu Nduka is a Nigerian poet, classical pianist, and musicologist. His poems have appeared in several publications including Saraba, […]

Abiku | Olowogboyega Olumuyiwa | Fiction

Yoruba Statues 1200 x 630

  The tour guide had begun by saying, “Traditional African art is characterized by fear, that’s why most of our […]

Thanks for signing up!

Never miss out on new posts. Subscribe to a digest, too:

No thanks, I only want the monthly newsletter.