Subscribe to Newsletter
Monthly Newsletter: Join more than 3,000 African literature enthusiasts!
Subscribe for African literature news, and receive a free copy of our "Guide to African Novels."

jalada-ngugi-translation

Last week, Jalada released a translation issue that instantly caused widespread uproar (of joy). The pan-African literary collective took one of Ngugi wa Thiongo’s short stories written in Kikuyu and proceeded to translate it into not one, two, three but 33 different languages, the majority of which were African languages.

This officially makes Ngugi’s story, titled “Ituĩka Rĩa Mũrũngarũ: Kana Kĩrĩa Gĩtũmaga Andũ Mathiĩ Marũngiĩ,” the most translated story in the recorded history of African literature.

Such a translation project is beyond mind-blowing for a whole lot of reasons, one of which is that it unites a community of readers around fiction written in African languages. For the first time, stories written in African languages— Sheng, Ibibio, Somali, Ahmharic, Dholuo, Kikamba, Lwisukha-Lwidakho, Ikinyarwada, Arabic, Luganda, Kiswahili, Afrikaans, Hausa, Meru, Lingala, IsiZulu, Igbo, isiNdebele, XiTsonga, Nandi, Rukiga and so on—are being circulated globally and are generating conversations among readers all over the world. Wow! So beautiful and so worth celebrating.

Click here to begin reading “The Upright Revolution: Or Why Humans Walk Upright” in any language of your choice.

African literary Twitter has been more than delighted about the whole thing. Here are a few of the remarks expressing excitement and celebrating what everyone agrees is a historic event.

*************

Header image via Mashable

Tags: , , ,

I hold a doctorate in English from Duke University and recently joined the Marquette University English faculty as an Assistant Professor. I love teaching African fiction and contemporary British novels. Brittle Paper is the virtual space/station where I play and experiment with ideas on how to reinvent African fiction and literary culture.

No comments yet.

Leave a Reply

I hold a doctorate in English from Duke University and recently joined the Marquette University English faculty as an Assistant Professor. I love teaching African fiction and contemporary British novels. Brittle Paper is the virtual space/station where I play and experiment with ideas on how to reinvent African fiction and literary culture.

Monthly Newsletter!

Subscribe for African literature news, and receive a free copy of our
"Guide to African Novels."

Archives

In Conversation with Hadiza El-Rufai, Author of An Abundance of Scorpions | Deaduramilade Tawak

an abundance of scorpions - syncity

Hadiza El-Rufai, founder of the Yasmin El-Rufai Foundation, debuted a novel this year, An Abundance of Scorpions, for which she recently […]

I Started Reading and Just Stopped Halfway and Thought—This is Really Bad | What Achebe, Soyinka, Adichie, Forna, Teju Cole and Serpell Thought About VS Naipaul

vs naipaul - irish examiner

VS Naipaul, Nobel Prize and Booker Prize-winning novelist and nonfiction writer, passed on days ago at 85 years of age. […]

This Mournable Body, the Last Book in Tsitsi Dangarembga’s Tambudzai Trilogy, is Here

this mournable body - tsitsi dangrembga

This Mournable Body, the last book in Tsitsi Dangarembga’s trilogy which includes the modern classic Nervous Conditions (1988) and The Book of […]

Five Beautiful Acts of Generosity by African Writers

yewande omotoso, karen jennings, noviolet bulawayo

In the midst of the pressure to deliver under that heavy tag “African Writer,” in the back and forth between […]

Watch the Trailer for the Stage Adaptation of Chigozie Obioma’s The Fishermen

the fishermen copy

In May of 2017, we announced preparations for the stage adaptation of Chigozie Obioma’s debut novel The Fishermen. Later in […]

Apply to the Write with Style Workshop with Oris Aigbokhaevbolo

Write with Style flyer

Words run the world: On the internet, and in novels, magazines, films, songs, and even love letters. How do you […]

Thanks for signing up!

Never miss out on new posts. Subscribe to a digest, too:

No thanks, I only want the monthly newsletter.