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She came from the hills, eyewitnesses say,
A stick of a girl,
Unassuming, plain.
Clasping a sunken stillness around her shoulders
Walking limply towards the full crowd,
A hapless saint, certain to live out her journey.
That market day,
Soon all around her beamed with light and
A burst of spiritless bodies tossed in the air,
Spectators and the suffering stunned in mid-chaos of
Collapsed stalls, mangled parts and earth,
Spread crudely in blood and crushed fruit.
There was splitting screams, loud wailings and
The irreparable silence of a girl
Burnt to memory.
Later that day, the passive news reports
Full of muddled figures,
Bore little confirmation, conflating confusion and
The wretchedness of postmortem outrage.

 

 

***********

Post image is an adaptation of a photograph by Surian Soosay via Flickr.

About the Author:

Portrait - IsaHajo Isa is a poet, photographer and soap maker. She is the Author of two books of poems titled Shadow Fall and Dancing Tongues. Hajo Isa lives in Abuja. You can reach her on Twitter: @Aitadi

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I hold a doctorate in English from Duke University and recently joined the Marquette University English faculty as an Assistant Professor. I love teaching African fiction and contemporary British novels. Brittle Paper is the virtual space/station where I play and experiment with ideas on how to reinvent African fiction and literary culture.

4 Responses to “The Child Bomb  | by Hajo Isa | African Poetry” Subscribe

  1. obakanse lakanse 2016/09/07 at 02:03 #

    ilove your narrative style-a poetics i have been advocating for years.with guys like you the future of nigerian poetry is bright

  2. Abubakar Sulaiman Muhd 2016/09/08 at 08:28 #

    Touching, it cruelly paints how events run after each incident?

  3. Oluwaseyi G. Abidoye 2016/09/12 at 13:52 #

    What appeals to me about this poem is the bold abandoning of norm, and the strong free expression.

  4. nhlanhla 2016/09/27 at 08:01 #

    I loved it too, great work.

Leave a Reply

I hold a doctorate in English from Duke University and recently joined the Marquette University English faculty as an Assistant Professor. I love teaching African fiction and contemporary British novels. Brittle Paper is the virtual space/station where I play and experiment with ideas on how to reinvent African fiction and literary culture.

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