Subscribe to Newsletter
Monthly Newsletter: Join more than 3,000 African literature enthusiasts!
Subscribe for African literature news, and receive a free copy of our "Guide to African Novels."
The Atlantic Washington Ideas Forum at the Harman Center, Tuesday, September 27 - Thursday, September 29, 2016, Washington, DC. (Photo by Max Taylor)

The Atlantic Washington Ideas Forum at the Harman Center, Tuesday, September 27 – Thursday, September 29, 2016, Washington, DC. (Photo by Max Taylor)

Chimamanda Adichie was interviewed during the Washington Ideas Forum last week. Ifemelu’s blogposts on race in America came up. The interviewer wanted to know how Ifemelu, one of Adichie’s most iconic fictional characters, would respond to the heightening racial tension in American society due, in part, to the recent cases of police killings.

Adichie uses the question as an occasion to reflect more generally on the recent tragedies.

“I think that I’m so emotionally exhausted by the murders that I don’t think I could find any space to wrap humor around what’s been happening in the past one year, two years.”

“It’s not just that you shoot a man who’s unarmed, it’s that you handcuff him when he’s clearly dying.”

“There’s something about it that’s so unforgivably inhumane and to think that his race is part of the reason … I really do think that one of the terrible things about racism in this country, is there’s a sense that blackness isn’t really seen as fully human in many quarters. I think that’s why these things happen. I think that’s why a man who is dying is handcuffed, that’s why a boy who is dead is left on the street for hours. It makes me wonder: What’s happened to that part of us that is good?”

Read the full coverage of the interview HERE.

 

**********

Post image via The Atlantic

 

 

Tags: ,

I hold a doctorate in English from Duke University and recently joined the Marquette University English faculty as an Assistant Professor. I love teaching African fiction and contemporary British novels. Brittle Paper is the virtual space/station where I play and experiment with ideas on how to reinvent African fiction and literary culture.

No comments yet.

Leave a Reply

I hold a doctorate in English from Duke University and recently joined the Marquette University English faculty as an Assistant Professor. I love teaching African fiction and contemporary British novels. Brittle Paper is the virtual space/station where I play and experiment with ideas on how to reinvent African fiction and literary culture.

Monthly Newsletter!

Subscribe for African literature news, and receive a free copy of our
"Guide to African Novels."

Archives

Pop Culture Website, Woke Africa, Is Looking for Contributors

IMG_20180405_181050_230

New pop culture Website WokeAfrica.com is seeking more contributors. Woke Africa was founded in December 2017, and despite being focused […]

To Betray the Nation, They Betrayed You First | Mukoma Wa Ngugi

winnie mandela

  (for Winnie Mandela) Because you were born Winnie Madikizela but died Winnie Mandela and you knew your real DOB […]

Bringing Achebe’s Masterpiece to Life | Highlights from the 60th Anniversary Reading of Things Fall Apart | Eddie Hewitt

southbank center chinua achebe 60 year anniversary

60 years on from the first publication of Things Fall Apart, I was excited to be in Queen Elizabeth Hall […]

Nnedi Okorafor, Henrietta Rose-Innes, Wole Talabi, Sibongile Fisher Lead 2018 Nommo Awards Shortlists

sibongile fisher

The 2018 shortlists for the four Nommo Awards for Speculative Fiction by Africans have just been announced. Among the shortlisted […]

GoFundMe | Please Donate to Help Get Selves Nonfiction Anthology into Print

SELVES gofundme 1

The team behind the remarkable e-anthology, Selves: An Afro Anthology of Creative Nonfiction, led by its curator, Basit Jamiu, have […]

New Collection of Plays Shines Light on African Women Playwrights

Contemporary Plays by African Women

There are many literary projects making a difference in the way we read and talk about African literature. One of […]

Thanks for signing up!

Never miss out on new posts. Subscribe to a digest, too:

No thanks, I only want the monthly newsletter.