TRS 122 Cover Email

Transition magazine has released its hotly awaited Issue 122 and it’s a confrontation with US president Donald Trump. Titled White A$$holes, the issue tackles the xenophobic and human rights-reversing atmosphere ignited by the man, and by so doing extends the magazine’s tradition of politically-charged publications, which include their Issue 114, Gay Nigeria.

The Issue 122 cover bears a depiction of Trump and a hilarious fake tweet by him about the publication. But more than challenging Trump, this issue celebrates the 40th anniversary of the 1977 miniseries, Roots.

The issue’s 34-piece content is remarkable in that it has space for only two pieces of fiction and just one for poetry. The rest are letters and opinions, essays, artworks and a talk, a few of which are collaborations. Holding our attention, as well, is that Chika Unigwe and Tope Folarin are featured and their pieces constitute “testimony on the fallout of Trump’s election.”

Read the announcement below.

In an era that many had wished to call postracial, Transition 122 ‘White A$$holes’ responds to the Trump presidency. With a new U.S. Administration empowering xenophobic tendencies and threatening to reverse decades of progress towards civil rights, contributors call for continued vigilance and aggressive dissent if we expect the arc to continue to bend towards justice. Editor Alejandro de la Fuente reflects on the written word as a powerful form of protest. Cornel West offers hope, and summons W. E. B. Du Bois to ask, ‘how shall integrity face oppression?’ in an era of escalating despair.

Issue 122 also celebrates the 40thAnniversary of the Roots miniseries with materials touching on the global influence—from Egypt to Canada to Australia—of Alex Haley’s family saga, guest edited by Erica L. Ball and Kellie Carter Jackson.

A publication of Harvard University’s Hutchins Center for African and African American Research, Transition has, since its founding in 1961, always taken a lead in facing political questions. It was the major platform for African writers in the ’60s and ’70s, and continues to be a go-to space for African-African American consultation. Tope Folarin’s 2013 Caine Prizewinning “Miracle” was published in the

Read the full announcement on Harvard’s Website.

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Post image from Harvard’s Website.

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About Otosirieze Obi-Young

View all posts by Otosirieze Obi-Young
Otosirieze Obi-Young’s writing has been shortlisted for the 2016 Miles Morland Writing Scholarship, the 2017 Gerald Kraak Award, and nominated for a 2015 Pushcart Prize. His fiction has appeared in Transition (“A Tenderer Blessing,” 2015), The Threepenny Review (“Mulumba,” 2016), and Pride and Prejudice: African Perspectives on Gender, Social Justice and Sexuality (“You Sing of a Longing,” 2017), an anthology of The Jacana Literary Foundation and The Other Foundation. His work further appears in Interdisciplinary Academic Essays, Africa in Dialogue, and Brittle Paper, where he is submissions editor. He is the editor of the Art Naija Series: a sequence of concept-based e-anthologies of writing and visual art focusing on different aspects of Nigerianness. The first anthology, Enter Naija: The Book of Places (Oct., 2016) focuses on cities. The second, Work Naija: The Book of Vocations (June, 2017) focuses on professions. He attended the University of Nigeria, Nsukka and currently teaches English at another Nigerian university. When bored, he blogs pop culture at naijakulture.blogspot.com or just Googles Rihanna.

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I hold a doctorate in English from Duke University and recently joined the Marquette University English faculty as an Assistant Professor. I love teaching African fiction and contemporary British novels. Brittle Paper is the virtual space/station where I play and experiment with ideas on how to reinvent African fiction and literary culture.

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