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Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie. Photo credit: City Lit.

The Washington Post recently asked some writers which book they would be reading for the summer, and two of the featured writers were Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie and Imbolo Mbue.

Adichie, whose latest book of non-fiction, Dear Ijeawele or A Feminist Manifesto in Fifteen Suggestions, won the 2017 Le Grand Prix De L’héroïne Madame Figaro, chose Isabel Wilkerson’s 2010 historical study The Warmth of Other Suns: The Epic Story of America’s Great Migration. She wrote:

I’m planning to read Isabel Wilkerson’s The Warmth of Other Suns, which I have been saving to read for a while and am very much looking forward to.

The Warmth of Other Suns, which won the National Book Critics Circle Award for Nonfiction, is a retelling of the historical migration of African-Americans from the Southern part of the United States to the other parts of the country between 1915 and 1970.

Imbolo Mbue.

Imbolo Mbue’s response was much longer. The Cameroonian, whose acclaimed debut Behold the Dreamers won the PEN/Faulkner Award and was picked for Oprah’s Book Club, chose up to six books, including Jennifer Makumbi’s ubiquitous first novel Kintu:

Recent or soon-to-be-released books I would love to read this summer include Naoki Higashida’s memoir of living with severe autism, Fall Down 7 Times Get Up 8; Jonathan Dee’s The Locals (it sounds very ambitious and seemingly explores several social issues our country is currently dealing with); Stephanie Powell Watt’s No One is Coming to Save Us; Jennifer Nansubuga Makumbi’s debut novel, Kintu; Jesmyn Ward’s Sing, Unburied, Sing; and Jim St. Germain’s A Stone of Hope, a memoir which I’ve heard presents an exceptional argument for criminal justice reform.

You certainly have an excuse to make that trip to the bookstore after all. With seven books recommended by two of the biggest names in African literature, it might just be time to update your library. What are you reading now? Tell us in the comments section.

Read The Washington Post‘s full feature HERE.

 

 

About the Reporter:

Kanyinsola Olorunnisola is a poet, essayist and fiction writer and founder of SPRINNG literary movement. He writes from Ibadan, Nigeria. His writings border on the themes of unease, racism, colonialism, terror and all things familiar to the black folk. He describes his art as that specialized literary alchemy which aims to extract beauty from the frail commonplaceness of words. His experimental works have appeared on such platforms as TUCK Magazine, Brittle PaperKalahari ReviewBombay ReviewLunaris ReviewAfrican WriterSprinng.orgAuthorpedia, ParousiaMagazine and Sampad International Journal. He was the 2016 recipient of the Albert Jungers Poetry Prize.

About Otosirieze Obi-Young

View all posts by Otosirieze Obi-Young
Otosirieze Obi-Young is a writer, journalist, & Deputy Editor of Brittle Paper. He sits on the judging panels of The Miles Morland Writing Scholarships and of The Gerald Kraak Prize. He is Nonfiction Editor at 14, Nigeria’s first queer art collective, which has published volumes including We Are Flowers (2017) and The Inward Gaze (2018). He is Curator at The Art Naija Series, a sequence of e-anthologies of writing and visual art focusing on different aspects of Nigerianness, including Enter Naija: The Book of Places (2016), which explores cities, and Work Naija: The Book of Vocations (2017), which explores professions. His work in queer equality advocacy in literature has been profiled in Literary Hub. His fiction has appeared in The Threepenny Review and Transition. He has completed a collection of short stories, You Sing of a Longing, is working on a novel, and is represented by David Godwin Associates literary agency. He has an M.A. in African Studies and a combined honours B.A. in History & International Studies/English & Literary Studies, both from the University of Nigeria, Nsukka. He taught English in a private Nigerian university. He is currently nominated for the inaugural The Future Awards Prize for Literature. Find him at otosirieze.com, where he accepts writing and editing offers, or on Instagram or Twitter: @otosirieze. When bored, he Googles Rihanna.

11 Responses to “What Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie and Imbolo Mbue Are Reading This Summer” Subscribe

  1. Hannah September 27, 2017 at 7:37 am #

    Like a Mule Bringing Ice Cream to the Sun, with Born a Crime next in line.

  2. Obinna Udenwe September 27, 2017 at 8:08 am #

    I am reading A Gecko’s Farewell.

  3. enite September 27, 2017 at 10:20 am #

    Currently reading “Siddhartha ” by Hermann Hesse. Just got through with “Bluest Eye ” by Toni Morrison.

  4. Ken Onwuzuka September 27, 2017 at 11:18 am #

    Currently Reading “Living Happily & Ever Smiling” by Kenneth Onwuzuka, a Nigerian Author

  5. Ken Onwuzuka September 27, 2017 at 11:22 am #

    I can’t wait to read the release “Life in the Nigerian Defence Academy in Our days” By Brig Gen DG Udofa.

  6. Nnedimma Anumba September 27, 2017 at 11:34 am #

    My dear Mrs Adichie, all I can say now is gisi ike na-oru. I’m so proud you are my role model. You’ve set the pace that I’ll follow. Looking forward to meeting you one day.

  7. Chukwuemeka September 28, 2017 at 4:02 am #

    Hoping to read this October, Dan Brown’s Angels And Demon.

  8. Nkiacha Atemnkeng September 30, 2017 at 2:14 pm #

    Currently reading “Tram 83” par le romanciere Congolais, Fiston Mwanza Mujila. I’ve been reading ti so slowly for more than a month ebcause I don’t want it to get finished. The Tram is in a league of its own!

  9. Tsitsi Nomsa Ngwenya October 2, 2017 at 2:15 am #

    I am reading Sons and Lovers by DL Lawrence and Americannah by Chimamanda Adichie

  10. Tsitsi Nomsa Ngwenya October 2, 2017 at 2:17 am #

    I am reading Sons and Lovers by D.L Lawrence and Americannah by Chimamanda Ngozie Adichie

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