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The cover for the inaugural Gerald Kraak Award. The image is from the co-winning collection of photographs by Sarah Waiswa.

The 2018 Gerald Kraak Award just reopened for submissions. The award had earlier closed for submissions on 31 July but, in a lucky twist for people who missed out, made the decision “due to a technical glitch with our online submissions portal,” and now has a new deadline: 13 October 2017.

Here is the announcement made hours ago on Jacana Media’s Website:

The Jacana Literary Foundation (JLF) and the Other Foundation have decided to reopen submissions for the second annual Gerald Kraak Award due to a technical glitch with our online submissions portal. If you have submitted but haven’t heard back from us, please resubmit. We will also be accepting new entries during this open submissions period until 13 October 2017.

Founded in 2016, the Gerald Kraak Award aims to honour works that focus on experiences of gender, social justice and sexuality. The award is given in honour of the late activist Gerald Kraak.

The inaugural award went to Ugandan-born Kenyan photographer Sarah Waiswa and Kenyan writer Farah Ahamed. The anthology was launched in May. It is titled Pride and Prejudice: African Perspectives on Gender, Social Justice and Sexuality.

The guidelines for the 2018 prize remain unchanged.

Rules

The subject matter of the work must relate to gender, human rights and/or sexuality in Africa.

Works which fall within one of the following categories are accepted:

         fiction
         non-fiction
         poetry
         photography / photographic essays
         journalism / magazine reporting
         scholarly articles in academic journals and book chapters / extracts
         social media / blog writings and contributions
         Entries must have been created by a citizen of an African country, who lives and works on the continent. Written submissions must be in English.
         Up to three entries are permitted per author, across categories. Each entry must be submitted on a separate electronic entry form.
         Please number your pages, use a font size of 12, Times New Roman and 1.5 spacing (avoid unnecessary formatting, such as borders).
         Materials must not exceed 15 000 words or 10 images.
         We are looking for work which tells a story or illustrates an idea. If one photograph achieves this, then we welcome the submission of that single image. It is, however, more likely to be accomplished through a collection of photographs or a photographic essay.
         We accept unpublished as well as previously published works.
         No handwritten or hard copy entries can be considered. Submissions must be made via the online portal.
         Entries must include a short biography (100 words maximum) and contact details. These should not be included on the work being submitted, as the award is judged blind and the author remains anonymous until the shortlist has been selected.

Submissions are considered to implicitly indicate the entrant’s permission for their work to be published in the anthology, if shortlisted, for no payment or royalty.

Submit, or resubmit, to the award HERE.

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Otosirieze is deputy editor of Brittle Paper. He is a judge for the 2018/19 Gerald Kraak Prize. He is an editor at 14, Nigeria’s first queer art collective, which has published volumes including We Are Flowers (2017) and The Inward Gaze (2018). He is the curator of the Art Naija Series, a sequence of e-anthologies of writing and visual art focusing on different aspects of Nigerianness, including Enter Naija: The Book of Places (2016), which explores cities, and Work Naija: The Book of Vocations (2017), which explores professions. His fiction has appeared in The Threepenny Review and Transition. He has completed a collection of short stories, You Sing of a Longing, is working on a novel, and is represented by David Godwin Associates literary agency. He combined English and History at the University of Nigeria, Nsukka, is completing a postgraduate degree in African Studies, and taught English at Godfrey Okoye University, Enugu. Find him at otosirieze.com, where he accepts writing and editing offers, or on Instagram or Twitter: @otosirieze. When bored, he Googles Rihanna.

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