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For those of you who are desperately and constantly in search of African children’s books, Wanuri Kahiu’s recent collaboration with Lantana Publishing is a gift.

The book, written by Kenyan writer and filmmaker Wanuri Kahiu, is titled The Wooden Camel. It tells the story of Etabo, a Turkana boy living in the Northwest of Kenya, who dreams of becoming a camel racer.

Kahiu, who happens to be a close friend of Nigerian sci-fi writer Nnedi OKorafor, is known for her work on Pumzi, a sci-fi movie that got her critical acclaim as a foremost afrofuturist figure. Little wonder that The Wooden Camel is a burst of dreamy and imaginative details and elements.

The Wooden Camel is an inspiring story about a boy who pursues a cherished dream against all odds. The book delights the imagination and teaches children the rewarding experience of keeping their dreams alive.

The stunning illustration of Kahiu’s The Wooden Camel is the brilliant work of Italian illustrator Manuela Adreani. The illustrations are bright, colorful, and humorous.

You might know Lantana Publishing as the publisher of Nnedi Okorafor’s award-winning children’s book Chicken in the Kitchen. The independent London-based press publishes high-quality children’s books depicting diverse cultures. This commitment to diversity in children’s book publishing has gained Lantana considerable acclaim in the global literary scene.

This is one stunning piece of work! We need more children’s books depicting African life and communities. That is why this latest issue from Lantana is worth celebrating.

Congrats to Kahiu and Lantana!

Here are a few images from the book.

[Buy The Wooden Camel HERE or HERE. ]

 

 

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I hold a doctorate in English from Duke University and recently joined the Marquette University English faculty as an Assistant Professor. I love teaching African fiction and contemporary British novels. Brittle Paper is the virtual space/station where I play and experiment with ideas on how to reinvent African fiction and literary culture.

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I hold a doctorate in English from Duke University and recently joined the Marquette University English faculty as an Assistant Professor. I love teaching African fiction and contemporary British novels. Brittle Paper is the virtual space/station where I play and experiment with ideas on how to reinvent African fiction and literary culture.

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