Angeline Kamba, former member of the Caine Prize Council, has passed on. Image from Newsdzezimbabwe.co.uk.

The Caine Prize has published a tribute to Dr Angeline Kamba, former member of the prize’s council, who passed on in September of this year at age 81. Wife to the first black Vice-Chancellor of the University of Zimbabwe, Walter Kamba, Dr Angeline Kamba is known to have played an important role in the success of the very first Caine Prize ceremony in 2000.

Other members of the Caine Prize Council have praised her dedication. Margaret Busby has spoken about how her contribution to “the field of cultural heritage had historic significance and will be remembered.” Wangui wa Goro has praised “her role as a pioneering archivist,” stating that “her passion for literature and books is one which will endure.” Alistair Niven has highlighted how “she did the job with great astuteness and judgement.”

Here is an excerpt from the tribute.

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Dr. Angeline Kamba, who died on 12 September 2017 at the age of 81, was a member of the Council of the Caine Prize almost from its foundation. She played a key role in the first Caine Prize event held in Africa – the Award Ceremony in Harare, Zimbabwe, in July 2000 – and provided a Caine Prize presence in Zimbabwe thereafter, notably helping with the organisation of the Caine Prize Writers’ Workshop held in Zimbabwe in March 2014.

Angeline Kamba was the widow of the first black Vice-Chancellor of the University of Zimbabwe, Walter Kamba. He had previously been Dean of the Faculty of Law at Dundee University and Angeline had been in charge of the Law Library there. On their return to Zimbabwe shortly after Independence, Angeline was asked to take charge of the National Archives as Director. So successful was she at winning the respect and adoration of its initially mistrustful staff that she was then asked to take on the directorship of the Zimbabwe Government’s Manpower Commission, charged with achieving the progressive Africanisation of the Civil Service, a role which she accomplished with persuasive tact, skill and sensibility.

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Read the full tribute on the Caine Prize Blog HERE.